Hypertension and nephrology

[Therapy of isolated systolic hypertension III.]

FARSANG Csaba

OCTOBER 20, 2017

Hypertension and nephrology - 2017;21(05)

[In the elderly and very elderly (˃80 yrs), a wealth of data from large clinical trials are available, showing the necessity of treatment mostly with drug combinations - fix-combinations are preferred for increasing the adherence/persistence to therapy. Using diuretics, ACE-inhibitors/ARBs with calcium antagonists, and in special cases diuretics and beta blockers are also suggested by recent European guidelines (ESH, HSH). The target is <140 mmHg, but in octogenarians <150 mmHg. Some studies are pressing for even lower SBP (to around 120 mm Hg), but it seems to be wise to balance advantages/disadvantages, so the optimal SBP may be around 130 mmHg.]

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