Hypertension and nephrology

[Statins for elderly people, in primary prevention?]

BAJNOK László

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

Hypertension and nephrology - 2019;23(01)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33668/hn.23.001

[In a recent, retrospective cohort study, statin usage in primary prevention was found being not beneficial for patients (i) without diabetes over 75 years of age, and (ii) with diabetes over 85 years of age (75-84 years total mortality of diabetics was also lower). These findings are in sharp contrast to the two outstanding, double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized, a primary prevention studies done with rosuvastatin. Of these, 50% reduction in LDL-C in JUPITER was associated with a 50% reduction in risk and 25% reduction in LDL-C in HOPE-3 with 25% reduction in risk. Furthermore, subgroup analyzes did not indicate lower efficacy for the elderly. The recommendation of the European Atherosclerosis Society for primary preventions of the elderlies recommending consideration of statin use in these cases (Class IIa) is particularly relevant, especially in the presence of other risk factors such as hypertension. In the primary prevention lipid treatment, we can see quite clearly till 75 years of age and hopefully, we will even further after learning about the results of STAREE, a study that is designed to elderly and in which 40 mg atorvastatin is applied.]

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