Hypertension and nephrology

[Report of the 26th Postgraduate Training Congress of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension]

NEMCSIK János

OCTOBER 20, 2018

Hypertension and nephrology - 2018;22(05)

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Further articles in this publication

Hypertension and nephrology

[The importance of recognition and proper treatment of hypertension and the maintenance of adherence in hypertension care]

NEMCSIK János, PÁLL Dénes, JÁRAI Zoltán

[Hypertension is the leading cause of death and disability-adjusted life years. In the United States hypertension accounts for more cardiovascular (CV) deaths than any other modifiable CV disease risk factor and was second only to cigarette smoking as a preventable cause of death for any reason. In our country the situation is similar. In Hungary the number of subjects with hypertension is approximately 3.5 million and this high prevalence contributes markedly to the poor Hungarian CV morbidity and mortality figures. The recognition of hypertension, the initiation of drug therapy and the long-term follow- up of the patients is mainly the task of primary care. Besides that it inheres high responsibility, this is also a grateful commitment, as hypertension in most of the cases can be treated properly with lifestyle-changes and medications leading to a marked decrease of CV complications, especially stroke. In our review article we would like to focus on the high prevalence of hypertension worldwide as well as in our country, the exact implementation of screening, the risk reduction potential of the proper treatment and the importance of the long-term maintenance of treatment adherence.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[How Hemodialysis Started in Hungary in the Latter Half of the Past Century]

KARÁTSON András, KAKUK György, MAKÓ János, KISS Éva, ZAKAR Gábor

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[Significance of the Extracellular Matrix, Collagens and their Biomarkers in the Development and Prediction of Hypertension According to the Latest Literature Data]

LELBACH Ádám, KÁNTOR Márk, DÖRNYEI Gabriella, KOLLER Ákos

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[Report on the 18th Gyula Hypertension Day]

DUDÁS Mihály

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[Relationship between the Mediterranean Diet and the Prevention of High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Diseases]

DOLGOS Szilveszter

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