Hypertension and nephrology

[Prognostic role of arterial stiffness in IgA nephropathy]

SÁGI Balázs, KÉSŐI István, VAS Tibor, CSIKY Botond, KOVÁCS Tibor, NAGY Judit

DECEMBER 10, 2018

Hypertension and nephrology - 2018;22(06)

[Background: Arterial stiffness has a prognostic role in chronic cardiovascular diseases. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) determined by the carotid-femoral pulse detection is accepted as a gold standard method. Further diagnostic procedures are in use to assess the arterial stiffness including the finger photoplethysmography. The prognostic role of this method is limited in chronic renal diseases. The goal of our investigation was to determine the prognostic significance of the stiffness index (SIDVP) measured by the photoplethysmographic method in IgA nephropathy. Patients and methods: One hundred and three histologically proved IgA nephropathy patients with chronic kidney disease stage 1-4 were investigated (67 male, 36 female, 45 ± 11 years) and followed for an average 65 (6-107) months. The stiffness index was determined by the volume alteration of the digital artery during the cardiac cycle (Pulse Trace system, Micro Medical, Gilingham, Kent, UK). The primary combined end point was total mortality, major cardiovascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction or cardiovascular procedure, for example revascularisation) plus achieving end stage renal disease. The secondary end points were cardiovascular and renal end points alone. Results: The patients with increased stiffness index (> 10 m/s) had significantly more combined primary end point events (10/60 vs. 19/43, P = 0.015). In case of the secondary end points the renal end points were significantly more frequent in patients with higher stiffness index. Stiffness index has also proved to be an independent predictor on survival from other cardiovascular risk factors (age, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, lipid disturbances and decrease of renal function) using the Cox regression model in IgA nephropathy. Every 1 m/s increase in stiffness index resulted a 17% gain in the occurrence of the combined primary end point. Conclusions: Stiffness index determined by finger photoplethysmography is an eligible parameter to assess the prognosis in IgA nephropathy. Increased stiffness index in IgA nephropathy seems to be a good prognostic tool for identification of higher risk patients.]

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