Hypertension and nephrology

[Kidney diet and the patient compliance issue ]

LADÁNYI Erzsébet

SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

Hypertension and nephrology - 2019;23(04)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33668/hn.23.017

[There have been significant developments in the field of nephrology and dialysis as for the science and technology are concerned in the past decades. However, CKD patients still show high mortality and morbidity. From among the several factors determining the long-term outcome of CKD patients metabolic disorder and malnutrition play an important role. Malnutrition is often not diagnosed or is not paid enough attention to in the complex treatment of CKD patients. It is important to make both the patients and clinical staff more aware of proper nutrition and importance of prevention and treatment of malnutrition, respectively. The early diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition is of utmost importance in CKD patients. The long term renal failure and the accompanying malnutrition have a negative impact on their long term outcome and quality of life. Since the malnutrition causes a lot of complications, it is indispensable for dietitians and nephrologists to work closely together. Patient compliance is a determining factor in the successful implementation of renal diet.]

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