Hypertension and nephrology

[“Diet” Soft Drinks Increase Blood Pressure More than Those with Added Sugar]

VÁLYI Péter

FEBRUARY 10, 2016

Hypertension and nephrology - 2016;20(01)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Commentary to “The EQUAL Study: a European Study in Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 4 Patients” Published by Jager et al.]

DEÁL György, PATÓ Éva

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hypertension License 2016]

SZÉKÁCS Béla, KÉKES Ede, KISS István

Hypertension and nephrology

[Incorporation of ortho- and meta-tyrosine into cellular proteins leads to erythropoietin-resistance]

MIKOLÁS Esztella Zsóka, KUN Szilárd, LACZY Boglárka, MOLNÁR Gergő Attila, SÉLLEY Eszter, KŐSZEGI Tamás, WITTMANN István

[Introduction: Erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein hormone, which is responsible for the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid cell lines. Since it is widely used as the treatment of renal anaemia, EPO-resistance is a common concern. Aims: We aimed to perform in vitro experiments to investigate a possible mechanism of EPO-hyporesponsiveness. Methods: We used a factor dependent erythroblast cell line (TF-1). Two independent observers calculated cell counts simultaneously on day 1; 2 and 3 in Bürker cell counting chambers. Colorimetric method was used to measure protein concentrations. Measurement of protein-bound para-, ortho- and meta-tyrosine was performed with reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. We determined ERK and STAT5 activation using Western blot method. Results: In case of ortho- and meta-tyrosine pretreated cells time-dependent, EPOinduced proliferative activity was decreased compared to the 1.7 fold elevation of cell counts seen in para-tyrosine cultured cells. Protein concentration of ortho- and metatyrosine treated samples was significantly lower than control cells on the third day. Addition of para-tyrosine reclaimed EPO-sensitivity. Erythroblasts treated with orthoor meta-tyrosine contained lower concentrations of protein-bound para-tyrosine with higher ortho- and meta-tyrosine content. EPO dependent activation of ERK and STAT5 could be inhibited by ortho- or meta-tyrosine treatment. Conclusions: Elevated level of protein-bound ortho- and meta-tyrosine in erythroblasts can result in the pathological modification of intracellular signaling, leading to EPOhyporesponsiveness.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The Classics of Hypertonology 5. – Professor Neil Poulter]

KÉKES Ede

Hypertension and nephrology

[Blood Pressure Target Values for Patients with Chronic Renal Disease]

SARAFIDIS A. Pantelis, RUILOPE M. Luis

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Clinical Neuroscience

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

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We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.

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Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

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Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.