Hungarian Radiology

[Gastrointestinal stromal tumors]

BAHÉRY Mária

FEBRUARY 15, 2005

Hungarian Radiology - 2005;79(01)

[Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are characterized by remarkable variability in their differentiation potential. They are defined by their expression of KIT (CD117), a tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor. The expression of KIT is important to distinguish gastrointestinal stromal tumors with immunohistochemically method from other mesenchymal neoplasms such as leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas, leiomyoblastomas and schwannomas. Pathologically proved gastrointestinal stromal tumors are appropriate KIT-inhibitor therapy. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors arise with variable frequency throughout the gastrointestinal tract, they most frequently occur in the stomach (40-70%), followed by the small intestine (20-30%), colorectum (5- 15%) and esophagus (<5%). The most gastrointestinal stromal tumors arise within the muscularis propria, they most commonly have an exophytic growth pattern and manifest as dominant extraluminal masses. Radiologic features of gastrointestinal stromal tumors vary depending of tumor size and organ of origin. They are characteristically well circumscribed, sharply defined and have hemorrhage, necrosis or cyst formation. The radiologic features of gastrointestinal stromal tumors are often distinct from those of epithelial tumors. There are no specific radiologic features to separate gastrointestinal stromal tumors from other mesenchymal tumors, yet.]

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