Clinical Oncology

[P53 – the suppressor]

KOPPER László1

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

Clinical Oncology - 2019;6(01)

[Our basic nature requere cells quantity and quality to perform differenciate activity. p53 has the responsibility for quick out those cells who carries molecular failures in DNA avoiding transfer mutations into doughter cells. If the DNA-repair insuffi cient p53s with on apoptosis. Whe p53 is mutated the phenotypes are different in a wide range due to the heterogenity of the DNA damages, and also the expression pattern of a suppressor protein. With the increasing amout the damaged DNA the genomic instability elevates D the risk to development of tumors. It is linict mutated gene could be a promosing tr, 10t for therapy. So far the attempts have little value for the clinic.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, I. Patológiai és Kísérleti Rákkutató Intézet, Budapest

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