Clinical Oncology

[Oncological treatment on certain special cases]

FUTÓ Ildikó1, HORVÁTH Dorottya Katalin1, LANDHERR László1

APRIL 10, 2019

Clinical Oncology - 2019;6(02)

[Even in the absence of clinically signifi cant co-morbidities, cancer care is a major challenge for both patients and healthcare professionals. Routine anticancer treatment may be complicated by special clinical situations such as pregnancy or organ transplantation. The dosage of certain oncotherapy agents may be further affected by impaired renal and hepatic function or diabetes mellitus. These days, given the improved prognosis of cancerous diseases and increased survival, personalized therapy and prevention of long-term side effects is becoming particularly important, especially in the above-mentioned oncological situations. In this summary, we review the anticancer treatments recommended by ESMO in specifi c clinical situations.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem Általános Orvostudományi Karának Oktató Kórháza, Uzsoki Utcai Kórház, Budapest

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