Clinical Oncology

[News from the World]

DECEMBER 05, 2017

Clinical Oncology - 2017;4(04)

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Further articles in this publication

Clinical Oncology

[Hematopoetic stem cell transplantation for pediatric non-hematological solid tumors]

HAUSER Péter, KRIVÁN Gergely

[High-dose chemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue or allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the treatment of solid tumor with non-hematologic origin applied for more than three decades. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue is the part of standard fi rst line therapy for several chemosensitive tumors with unfavorable outcome (neuroblastoma, Ewing-sarcoma, medulloblastoma), and also successfully applied in certain therapy-resistant or recurrent solid tumors (germ cell tumors, Wilmstumor). Allogeneic transplantation with reduced intensity conditioning is still not successful in terms of survival in pediatric solid tumors with non-hematological origin. In present paper results of autologus and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in different pediatric solid tumor are discussed.]

Clinical Oncology

[Foreword]

A szerkesztők

Clinical Oncology

[Protontherapy]

LAKOSI Ferenc, HADJIEV Janaki, CSELIK Zsolt, GULYBÁN Ákos

[Radiotherapy with protons is a promising technology in the fi eld of modern radiation oncology. From a physical point of view, radiotherapy with protons has important advantages compared to the currently used photons due to its unique energy absorption profi le, which may result in a better local tumor control and reduced radiation-induced side effects. Increasing number of patients is treated with protons and carbon-ions. Our report aim to present the current status of proton radiotherapy including physical and technological aspects, standard and non-standard indications, ongoing clinical trials and the proton vs. photon debate in terms of patient selection.]

Clinical Oncology

[Inhibition of proteasome in cancer therapy]

KOPPER László

[The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is the most important element in the regulation of intracellular protein metabolism. Its main function is the degradation of the unnecessary proteins either as part of normal metabolic balance or in case of misfolding or part of the deregulation as in cancer cells using proteolytic enzymes. The importance of this pathway has been acknowledge by Nobel prize. In certain diseases as in several malignancies, where the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is not able to remove the proteins due to dysfunction or accumulation in a high quantity. The unregulated accumulation of proteins could lead to cell death. This phenomenon was proven by the appearance of proteasome-inhibitors targeting mainly myeloma. It should be mentioned that clinical aspects myeloma has been discussed in an excellent review by Mikala and his colleagues in Klinikai Onkológia.]

Clinical Oncology

[Current treatment therapy of prostate cancer]

KULLMANN Tamás, KOCSIS Károly, SZEPESVÁRY Zsolt

[Prostate cancer is a frequent and usually slowly progressing malignancy. Promising opportunities and risks to avoid may occur along its diagnosis and treatment. The chance of early detection is high. The localised disease can be cured by radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy with equal probability. The post-prostatectomy biochemical failure may be controlled by radiotherapy. Even oligometastatic tumours can be cured by harmonised local treatment modalities. The survival of metastatic disease can be prolonged by several years. Effi cacy of traditional androgen deprivation may be enhanced with completion by upfront docetaxel chemotherapy or androgen synthesis blocking agents. However, local and systemic treatments are not harmless. Overtreatment as well as undertreatment has to be avoided upon therapy planning.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[News of the Hungarian Society of Nephrology]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Computed tomographic examination of cranial lesions, a paleoradiological approach]

ZÁDORI Péter, BAJZIK Gábor, BÍRÓ Gergely, LELOVICS Zsuzsanna, BALASSA Tímea, BERNERT Zsolt, ÉVINGER Sándor, HAJDU Tamás, MARCSIK Antónia, MOLNÁR Erika, ŐSZ Brigitta, PÁLFI György, WOLFF Katalin, REPA Imre

[Background and purpose - Introducing the multidisciplinary paleoradiology research at the Institute of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology of the Kaposvár University, highlighting the cases with potential central nervous system involvement - from the scanning methods to the 3D printing - in order to draw attention to the historical background and clinical aspects of certain pathological conditions. Methods - The authors developed the examination protocols for three different CT scanners. Among the examined archaeological remains cranial lesions were identified in 26 cases, from which 4 cases with potential central nervous system involvement are demonstrated. The scanning parameters and the advantages of secondary image reconstructions (multiplanar reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, three-dimensional volume rendering technique) are presented with the cases. Results - The authors demonstrate a case with destructive skull lesions due to syphilis from the 15th century AD, a condition rarely seen or even unknown nowadays in the modern world. With the CT images of the skull base fracture from the Iron Age, signs of healing could be verified. Using the CT images a non-invasive approach is presented in the case of the craniofacial osteosarcoma in order to visualize the local status and the direct intracranial propagation. Advantages of the 3D VRT reconstructions are shown in the case of unilateral coronal suture synostosis. Conclusion - Paleoradiological CT examinations serve as a non-invasive, non-destructive tool for studying archaeological remains and artifacts. The special applications provided by the imaging modality contribute to the conventional paleopathological investigations. Keywords: paleoradiology, computed tomography, 3D reconstruction, skull lesions, paleopathology]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[THE IMPORTANCE OF THE RECOGNITION AND TREATMENT OF LIPID METABOLISM DISORDERS IN THE SECONDARY PREVENTION OF CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES]

FOLYOVICH András, HORVÁTH Eszter

[The high world prevalence of cerebrovascular diseases, and the particularly bad morbidity rates of Hungary are well known. The physiological properties of the brain make stroke prevention outstandingly important. Effective prevention will be reflected in the reduction of the late complications that are otherwise common and expensive to treat. Because of the common simultaneous development of stroke, cardiovascular and peripheral vascular diseases, overall vascular disease prevention is preferred, even if the various vascular diseases manifest in different degrees in a patient. Hungarian data also indicate the high risk of recurrence of cerebrovascular diseases, therefore, the importance of secondary prevention is obvious. Large international studies have proven the strokepreventing effect, and, by a pleiotropic drug action, additional benefits, of the efficient treatment of blood lipid disorders. Consensus conferences in recent years defined clear and even stricter lipid-lowering target values, mostly to be reached by “double inhibition”, bile acid binding resins, fibrates and nicotinic acid derivatives, beside the most common statin treatment. Neurological and stroke departments and clinics play a pivotal role in vascular prevention.]

Clinical Oncology

[News from the World]