Clinical Oncology

[News from the World]

FEBRUARY 10, 2017

Clinical Oncology - 2017;4(01)

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Further articles in this publication

Clinical Oncology

[Gene modifi ed T cell therapy for patients with cancer]

HECZEY András

[T cells genetically modifi ed to express chimeric antigen receptors can combine the antigen specifi city of monoclonal antibodies with the cytotoxic function, active biodistribution and long term persistence of T cells. The approach can induce 90% complete remission rate in patients with CD19+ lymphoid leukemias; however, the in patients with solid tumors the antitumor effi cacy of CAR T cells have not reached similar levels yet. The increased levels of interleukin-6 due to T cell activation play key roles in the majority of side effects and using anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab can effectively treat these complications. Novel gene modifi cation strategies and improvements in CAR T cell manufacturing, the approach has the potential to fundamentally change the way patients with cancer are treated in the not too distant future.]

Clinical Oncology

[Cancer treatment induced gastrointestinal complications]

AL-FARHAT Yousuf, AUTH Péter

[Systemic therapy (ST) (including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy) or radiation therapy (RT) can induce gastrointestinal side effects, which frequently affect patient’s quality of life. Sometimes side effects could be dose-limiting, or a reason to stop the treatment. The incidence and severity of gastrointestinal complications in patient’s receiving ST, RT, or chemoradiotherapy are affected by numerous factors, including: therapeutic agents, doses and route of administration, target of the RT (upper, lower abdomen or body) and individual patient variability (age, sex, prior cancer therapy, comorbidities, performance status). Mucositis occurs in approximately 20% to 40% of patients receiving conventional chemotherapy, 80% of patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy, nearly all patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy. mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS) is the most frequent dose-limiting toxicity (52.5%). More than 90% of patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy will have episodes of vomiting. However, only about 30% of these patients will vomit if they receive prophylactic antiemetic regimens.]

Clinical Oncology

[Treatment of neuroendocrine tumors]

PETRÁNYI Ágota

[Recently, the therapeutic possibilities for the locally invasive or metastatic neuroendocrine tumors developed signifi cantly, although we have no widely accepted predictive or prognostic factors, which could help to design the most effective sequential therapy. To make therapeutic strategy the internationally accepted clinical guidelines should be considered. The therapeutic activity has to be performed in oncological centers with the support of a multidisciplinary team.]

Clinical Oncology

[Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma – a road to personal therapy]

BÖDÖR Csaba

[The majority of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma can be cured using the standard rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone (R-CHOP) based therapy. However, approximately 30-40% of the patients are refractory to the therapy or they relapse. The currently available salvage therapies represent a realistic curative approach only for approximately one quarter of the patients. Therefore, there is unmet clinical need for more effi cient fi rst line and salvage therapies in DLBCL. The rapid advances in the fi eld of molecular genetic techniques lead to a better understanding of the biological heterogeneity as well as the discovery of the key factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Nowadays, the distinction between the cases with germinal center B-cell and activated B-cell origin characterized with different prognosis has therapeutic implications. Presently, the therapy of the so-called double-hit lymphomas also represents an unmet clinical need. The next generation sequencing based studies lead to the discovery of novel molecular targets, including components of different cellular signaling pathways, immune checkpoints and components of the microenvironment. Targeted therapies against many of these molecular targets are being tested in different clinical trials. Due the heterogeneity of the disease, it is of critical importance to identify those patient groups who will benefi t from a particular targeted therapy. Hopefully, this risk-adopted therapeutic approach will become soon available for patients with DLBCL. Currently, the R-CHOP therapy still represents the gold standard in treatment of patients with DLBCL.]

Clinical Oncology

[Cell cycle as therapeutic target – CDK4/6 inhibition]

KOPPER László

[One of the most important decision of a cell: to live or die. If survival is the choice, there are three options: proliferate, to stay in sleeping state for a while, or differentiate in order to perform its specifi c function. These decisions are under a very strict molecular regulation infl uenced by internal and external factors. Tumor cells more and more disregard the regulations, and move into independency for a continuous proliferation, which has a very similar program in normal and tumor cells. The main route towards mitosis is the cell cycle, under the supervision of positive and negative regulators, forming checkpoints, telling to the cell - under the infl uence of mitogenic signals - to go or to stop. The most critical checkpoint is at the border of G1 and S phases where the main players are cyclinD, CDK4/6 and RB1. It turned out that the best targets to inhibit cell proliferation are the CDKs, but this approach, when used unselected targets, was unsuccessful due to the toxicity. To improve the clinical results, the selection of CDK4/6 as a therapeutic target seems to fulfi l most of the hopes. Today three drugs are the most promising: palbociclib (with an acceptance by FDA and EMA to treat breast cancer patients), abemaciclib and ribociclib (underclinical trials). Now, most of the data concern breast cancer, especially the combinations of CDK4/6 inhibitors and endocrine therapy, but many other malignancies are studied (e.g. liposarcoma, mantel cell lymphoma, melanoma, renal cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, teratomas etc.). The key points are the side-effects, the most frequently observed is neutropenia, but so far it is managed without serious toxicity.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Gábor Winkler: Sightseeing in the world of opera]

MESTER Ádám

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[How to break sensitive news in the Ophthalmology, specifically at diabetic retinopathy ]

TÓTH Lívia, BÁLINT Zsófia, MÁTÉ Orsolya

[The aim of the study: To investigate the circumstances of breaking bad news by health care professionals and the conditions of communication at the Ophthalmology Clinic of the University of Pécs, among diabetic retinopathy patients. Material and method: Quantitative and cross-sectional examination, February-December 2018. Statistical methods: descriptive and mathematical statistics (χ2-test), SPSSv22, (p<0,05). Results: Most of the examined medical professionals working at the clinic (20 persons/90.90%) can’t be supported by a protocol for breaking bad news, however, the need for a protocol is formulated as more than half of the respondents (11 persons/59.09%). Conclusions: Health care professionals would need to develop a protocol to break bad news in health care institutions, also in the Clinic of Ophthalmology, furthermore, attention should be paid to improving the circumstances during providing information to patients.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Psychiatry or an Alternative?]

ZÖRGŐ Szilvia

[Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is increasing in the plural healthcare market of our globalized world. Aside from a healthcare market, we may also speak of a “worldview market” in which various concepts of health and illness compete with each other and in which patients strive to orient themselves. In a milieu of prolific information production, “facts” are increasingly under subjective judgement. Thus topics such as mechanisms underlying the appraisal of information sources regarding healthcare, as well as processes behind decision-making and building or losing trust have risen in significance. Orientation in the sea of information is largely determined by global trends, societal-level phenomena, as well as cultural dispositions or preferences that take root in the individual; these factors also influence therapy choice. Such preferences include that of “holism” and the “natural”, as well as a desire for initiation; these dispositions play a vital role in information processing and decision-making, for example when the patient is weighing whether to turn to a psychiatrist or a CAM specialist. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Frequency and types of headaches in patients with metabolic syndrome

DEMIRYÜREK Enes Bekir, EMRE Ufuk, KORUCU Osman, BARUT Özen Banu, TASCILAR Nida Fatma, ATASOY Tugrul Hüseyin, DEMIRYÜREK Esra, YAYLACI Selcuk, GENC Bilal Ahmet

Background - Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and headaches are common public health problems in whole world. The relationship between headaches and the MetS isn’t understood clearly. Purpose - The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and types of headaches, and evaluate the relationship between headache characteristics and clinical and laboratory parameters analyzed in patients diagnosed with MetS. Materials and methods - Of the patients diagnosed with MetS in Endocrinology outpatient clinics between July 2011 and July 2012, 202 patients were included in the study. Hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose (FBG), total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL and LDL cholesterol, thyroid function tests and HbA1c values of all patients were recorded. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were applied to all patients. The headache severity was assessed by Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results - The prevalence of headache in patients with MetS was found to be 61.4%. The incidence of headache was higher in female patients (F: 86.4%, M: 13.6%). The distribution of the subtypes of headaches was as follows: Episodic Tension-Type Headaches (ETTH) 24.8%, Episodic Migraine 14.4%, Chronic Tension-Type Headaches (CTTH) 11.3%, Episodic Tension-Type Headaches (ETTH) and Episodic Migraine 7.9%, and other types of headaches (Cervicogenic Headache and Cluster Headache) 3%. No statistically significant relationship was found between headache and non-headache groups in terms of body mass index, waist circumference, and the laboratory parameters (p>0.05). The mean BDI and BAI scores were higher in the headache group (p<0.001 and p<0.001). No significant difference was found between the mean MIDAS scores in the subtypes of headaches (p=0.35). In the headache group, there was a significant relationship only between triglyceride levels and attack frequency, duration and severity. Conclusion - Prevalence of headache in patients with MetS was 61.4%. The incidence of subtypes of headaches was similar to those in the general population. A relationship was found between triglyceride levels and attack frequency and severity. The result may be important to draw attention to the evaluation of triglyceride levels for reducing the frequency and severity of attacks in patients with headaches.