Clinical Oncology - 2019;6(01)

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[Practical use of meta-analyses in predicting disease risk, outcome, and therapy response in breast cancer]

KAHÁN Zsuzsanna, TARI Gergely, ENYEDI Márton, HARACSKA Lajos

[Germinal BRCA status infl uences patient care both in early and advanced/metastatic breast cancer. Ideally, the patient should make the decision on the type of surgery or the avoidance of radiotherapy being aware of the BRCA status; based on the most recent clinical studies, this knowledge may infl uence the type of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or metastatic setting or may raise the use of emerging targeted therapies. DNA-targeting cytostatic agents, mostly platinum agents and... tovább »

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[The role of the microbiome in the etiology and treatment of neoplastic diseases]

TORDAI Attila, PETÁK István, SCHWAB Richárd, BACSUR Emese

[Experimental data on the role of the microbiome in the onset and progression of infl ammatory diseases and cancer have been accumulated for years. An important milestone in this respect was the discovery that APC mutant mice in sterile conditions do not develop colon cancer of the FAP type. The direct role of the Enterobacteriaceae and Fusobacteriaceae bacterial families were also shown in the pathomechanism of the same experimental model. The toxic effect of chemotherapy on the gut fl ora has... tovább »

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[Practical use of meta-analyses in predicting disease risk, outcome, and therapy response in breast cancer]

GYŐRFFY Balázs, MENYHÁRT Otília

[Breast cancer is globally the most frequent malignant disease in women with increasing incidence. Meta-analyses using data from a large set of patients combining genetic and standard clinicopathological features provide valuable models in predicting disease risk, outcome and therapy response. With the advent of molecular technologies, the amount of available data generated for each tumor and each patient is growing exponentially. The increased data availability allows the development of new... tovább »

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[Molecular subtypes and the evolution of treatment decisions in metastatic colorectal cancer]

RODRIGO Dienstmann, RAMON Salazar, JOSEP Tabernero

[Colorectal cancer (CRC) has clinically-relevant molecular heterogeneity at multiple levels: genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics and microenvironment features. Genomic events acquired during carcinogenesis remain drivers of cancer progression in the metastatic setting. For example, KRAS and NRAS mutations defi ne a population refractory to EGFR monoclonal antibodies, BRAFV600E mutations associate with poor outcome under standard therapies and response to targeted inhibitors in combinations,... tovább »

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[P53 – the suppressor]

KOPPER László

[Our basic nature requere cells quantity and quality to perform differenciate activity. p53 has the responsibility for quick out those cells who carries molecular failures in DNA avoiding transfer mutations into doughter cells. If the DNA-repair insuffi cient p53s with on apoptosis. Whe p53 is mutated the phenotypes are different in a wide range due to the heterogenity of the DNA damages, and also the expression pattern of a suppressor protein. With the increasing amout the damaged DNA the... tovább »

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[The role of artifi cial intelligence in precision medicine]

MESKÓ Bertalan

[The essence of practicing medicine has been obtaining as much data about the patient’s health or disease as possible and making decisions based on that. Physicians have had to rely on their experience, judgement, and problem-solving skills while using rudimentary tools and limited resources. With the cultural transformation called digital health, disruptive technologies have started to make advanced methods available not only to medical professionals but also to their patients. These... tovább »

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[Liquid biopsy in clinical oncology – fine-tuning precision medicine]

HARACSKA Lajos, PRISKIN Katalin, PINTÉR Lajos, JAKSA Gábor, PÓLYA Sára, KAHÁN Zsuzsa, SÜKÖSD Farkas

[The classical method of genetically characterising a tumour requires tissue biopsy with which a small sample is removed from the affected organ. This sample represents the tumour in the further analyses. However, the localised nature of sample collection limits representative characterisation. The so-called circulating tumour DNA, isolated from blood plasma after a simple sample collection, potentially enables the oncological analysis of all tumour tissues carrying genetic alterations that can... tovább »