Clinical Neuroscience

Watershed infarction in hypereosinophilic syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma in FIP1L1-PDGFR alpha-associated myeloid neoplasm

IMELDA Marton1, PÓSFAI Éva1, ANNUS János Kristóf2, BORBÉNYI Zita1, NEMES Attila1, VÉCSEI László2,3, VÖRÖS Erika4,5

MAY 30, 2015

Clinical Neuroscience - 2015;68(05-06)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.68.0212

Introduction - The FIP1L1-PDGFR alpha-positive, hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a new category of hematological entities. Various clinical symptoms may occur, with no specific characteristics in either the clinical picture or the neuroimaging findings, and this may give rise to a diagnostic dilemma. A report on a long follow-up period (10 years) in a case of HES that presented with neuropsychiatric symptoms appears to be unique. Besides the complexity of the diagnostic process, the successful treatment is discussed. Case report - The HES was diagnosed in a male patient at the age of 33 years, with involvement of the central nervous system and the myocardium. After the onset of the clinical signs, the MRI indicated bilateral cerebral and cerebellar cortico-subcortical lesions involving the watershed areas, mainly in the parieto-occipital regions. High-dose intravenous steroid (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day) alleviated the neurological symptoms within a few weeks, and the administration of imatinib (200 mg/day) resulted in an impressive regression of the hypereosinophilia and splenomegaly within 6 weeks. During the follow-up, the patient has continued to receive imatinib. The molecular remission has persisted, no new complaints have developed and the condition of the patient has remained stable. Conclusion - The timely recognition of the HES and identification of the disease subtype which led to the administration of imatinib may be the key to successful treatment. The long stable follow-up period gives rise to a new dilemma in the treatment of the HES in these special cases: for how long should a patient receive a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and may the treatment be suspended?

AFFILIATIONS

  1. 2nd Department of Medicine and Cardiology Centre, Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Centre, Medical Faculty, University of Szeged
  2. Department of Neurology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Centre, Medical Faculty, University of Szeged
  3. Neuroscience Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged
  4. Department of Radiology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Centre, Medical Faculty, University of Szeged
  5. Euromedic Diagnostics Szeged

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