Clinical Neuroscience

[UPDATES IN PRACTICAL NEUROLOGY - I. THE PRINCIPLES OF MODERN LEVODOPA THERAPY IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE]

KLIVÉNYI Péter, VÉCSEI László

JANUARY 20, 2007

Clinical Neuroscience - 2007;60(01-02)

[Despite the levodopa is used for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease for a long time, recently many questions raised about its clinical use. New issues emerged based on the clinical trials, on latest neuroimaging data and on better understanding the pathomechanism of motor complications. These observations have changed the routine clinical use of levodopa. In this review we summarize the evidences and practical implications of levodopa therapy.]

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BARCS Gábor, SZŰCS Anna

[Objective - A retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy of levetiracetam in the treatment of adult pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Method - Retrospective work up of our treatmentexperiences with 55 pharmacoresistant patients treated with levetiracetam (11 of them on monotherapy) for 6-39 months. Three treatment groups were analysed: idiopathic generalised epilepsy (9 patients); partial epilepsy (30 patients); malignant or malignated epileptic syndromes (16 patients). Result - Seven idiopathic generalised patients (77%) and 5 partial epilepsy patients (16%) became seizure free. One idiopathic generalised epileptic patient, 10 partial epilepsy patients (33%) significantly improved. Six patients (37%) from the group of malignant or malignated epileptic syndromes also significantly improved. Five of the improved idiopathic generalised epilepsy patients and 6 of the improved partial epilepsy patients received levetiracetam monotherapy. Altogether seven patients (12% of the whole population) relapsed after a 4-15 months improved period. Fifteen patients (27%) suffered side effects (mainly somnolence, headache, dizziness and irritability) improving after dose reduction of levetiracetam (generally below 2000 mg pro day). Conclusion - Levetiracetam is an effective, well tolerable, broad-spectrum drug as adjunctive treatment or monotherapy in adult patients unsuccessfully treated with other antiepileptic drugs.]

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[The restless legs syndrome is a disorder belonging to the family of movement disorders during sleep, often remains unrecognized, although it is the second most common cause of chronic sleep deficiency and daytime sleepiness. In accordance with international guidelines, pharmacotherapy of this disorder should begin with a dopamine agonist. Owing to their efficacy and favorable safety profile, newly introduced, selective dopamine agonists have become extensively used for this purpose. This study evaluated the efficacy of one of the products in this group, pramipexole. Fifty-one patients suffering from idiopathic restless legs syndrome underwent monotherapy with pramipexole in daily doses of 0.25 to 1.0 mg. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated using three tools, i.e. follow-up questionnaires, actigraphy, and Forced Immobilisation Test. An excellent therapeutic effect was seen in more than 80 per cent of the study population. As shown by findings of the follow-up questionnaires, pramipexole resulted in substantial improvements of both daytime and nighttime symptoms of RLS. Actigraphy monitoring demonstrated a statistically significant increase in the ratio of time spent without limb movement to the time spent in bed; furthermore, the result of the Forced Immobilisation Test also improved. It seems fair to conclude from the findings of this study that pramipexole monotherapy is an effective treatment in restless legs syndrome.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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