Clinical Neuroscience

[Ulcerative carpal tunnel syndrome]

KAMONDI Anita1,2, TEIXEIRA Jose Maria2, SZIRMAI Imre1,2

JANUARY 30, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(01-02)

[The carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent compression-induced neuropathy. A severe but rare clinical manifestation of this disorder associates with ulceration, acral osteo-lysis and mutilation of the terminal phalanges of the second and third fingers. Recognition of this disorder is difficult, because various dermatological and internal diseases might lead to acral ulcerative lesions, and these patients are seldom referred to neurological and/or electrodiagnostic examination. In this article, we present three cases of this rare clinical form of carpal tunnel syndrome and discuss the electrodiagnostic findings. The early diagnosis is important since decompression of the median nerve in due time might prevent mutilation and could significantly improve the patients’ quality of life.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Klinikai Neurofiziológiai Laboratórium, Budapest
  2. GEN Gabinete de Estudos de Neurofisiologia , Porto, Portugália

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[ULCERATIVE CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME]

KAMONDI Anita, TEIXEIRA Jose Maria, SZIRMAI Imre

[The carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent compression- induced neuropathy. A severe but rare clinical manifestation of this disorder associates with ulceration, acral osteolysis and mutilation of the terminal phalanges of the second and third fingers. Recognition of this disorder is difficult, because various dermatological and internal diseases might lead to acral ulcerative lesions, and these patients are seldom referred to neurological and/or electrodiagnostic examination. In this article, we present three cases of this rare clinical form of carpal tunnel syndrome and discuss the electrodiagnostic findings. The early diagnosis is important since decompression of the median nerve in due time might prevent mutilation and could significantly improve the patients’ quality of life.]