Clinical Neuroscience

[Types of thermal nystagmus induced in healthy individuals ]

BODÓ György1

MAY 01, 1969

Clinical Neuroscience - 1969;22(05)

[The author studied 71 healthy individuals with an electronystagmograph wall and the types of nystagmus induced by thermal stimulation. Five basic types were identified, as follows: 1. regular reactio, where the amplitude and frequency of nystagmus are moderate, 2. weak reactio, where the nystagmus strokes are rare and the amplitude is small. This group also includes fibrillation and floating movements of the eyeball. 3. large reactio, with a high frequency of nystagmus beats and a rapid frequency, 4. uneven reactio, the frequency and amplitude of the strokes are uneven, 5. clustering, in which the nystagmus is interrupted by pauses. The author considers it possible that by further study of the typus of the thermal nystagmus, useful information about the functional typus and the instantaneous state of the central nervous system can be obtained.]

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[Three cases of juvenile pseudomyopathy of spinal muscular atrophy (Kugelberg-Welander type)]

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