Clinical Neuroscience

[THORACIC MENINGOCELE]

FEKETE Tamás Fülöp1, VERES Róbert1, NYÁRY István1

NOVEMBER 30, 2006

Clinical Neuroscience - 2006;59(11-12)

[Herniation of the meninges through a defect of the spinal canal is a spinal meningocele, and is usually located dorsally in the lumbosacral region. Meningoceles are usually part of a complex developmental disorder, or of a systemic disease, or it can be iatrogenic, as well. We report a very rare case of a true anterior thoracic meningocele.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Országos Idegsebészeti Tudományos Intézet, Budapest

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