Clinical Neuroscience

[The Congress of the American Neuro-ophthalmological Society (NANOS)]

SOMLAI Judit

JUNE 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(05-06)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[The 6th National Congress of Hungarian Chapter of International League against Epilepsy]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Identification of gliomas by morphological and immunocytochemical analysis in cell cultures]

FAZEKAS Ilona, KEREKES Edit, HEGEDŰS Balázs, NYÁRY István

[Introduction - The morphology and immunocytochemical properties of 250 different monolayer cultures derived from various human brain tumor specimens were investigated on purpose to support and complement the neuropatholgical diagnosis. In this study analyses of 124 glioma cases are presented. Methods - The tumor samples were mechanically dissociated and seeded on glass coverslips. After the formation of the monolayer cultures were fixed and stained by May-Grünwald- Giemsa method for the morphological examination. Semi-quantitative immunocytochemical labeling included several different types of mono- and polyclonal primary antibodies using avidin-biotin visualization system. In nine cases of the glioblastomas the sufficient proliferation made possible to establish cell lines from the primary cultures. Results - The glial origin of the tumors was identified in 124 cases based upon the presence of glial fibrillary acidic protein. A negative correlation between the intensity of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunostaining and the grade of tumor malignancy was found. During long-term cultivation of the higher grade gliomas the incidence and intensity of glial fibrillary acidic protein labeled cells was decreasing. Both the vimentin and the neuron specific enolase labeling were in general stronger than the glial fibrillary acidic protein and almost all the cells were stained. The incidence of Ki-67 positive cells increased with the grade of malignancy. Concerning the tumor classification our immunocytochemical results correlated with the routine histopathological examination. Conclusions - On the basis of these results we conclude that monolayer cultures obtained from tumor specimens can support and complement the correct diagnosis of the various human brain tumors.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The Future of Neuro-rehabilitation]

FÁY Veronika, URBÁN Erika, SZÉPNÉ Kontra Andrea

Clinical Neuroscience

[In remembrance of Kálmán Sántha, on his 45th death anniversary]

SZIRMAI Imre

Clinical Neuroscience

[Levetiracetam: a molecule with new mechanism of action in the treatment of epilepsy]

SZÖKÕ Éva

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In aging societies, the morbidity and mortality of dementia is increasing at a significant rate, thereby imposing burden on healthcare, economy and the society as well. Patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life and life expectancy are greatly determined by the early diagnosis and the initiation of available symptomatic treatments. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have been the cornerstones of Alzheimer’s therapy for approximately two decades and over the years, more and more experience has been gained on their use in non-Alzheimer’s dementias too. The aim of our work was to provide a comprehensive summary about the use of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and non-Alzheimers’s dementias.

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A variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination: AMSAN

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Introduction - Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory infection that has rapidly become a global pandemic and vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 have been developed with great success. In this article, we would like to present a patient who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), which is a serious complication after receiving the inactive SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (CoronaVac). Case report – A 76-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department with nine days of progressive limb weakness. Two weeks prior to admission, he received the second dose of CoronaVac vaccine. Motor examination revealed decreased extremity strength with 3/5 in the lower extremities versus 4/5 in the upper extremities. Deep tendon reflexes were absent in all four extremities. Nerve conduction studies showed predominantly reduced amplitude in both motor and sensory nerves, consistent with AMSAN (acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy). Conclusion - Clinicians should be aware of the neuro­logical complications or other side effects associated with COVID-19 vaccination so that early treatment can be an option.

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[Consensus statement of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenic Society about the therapy of adult SMA patients]

BOCZÁN Judit, KLIVÉNYI Péter, KÁLMÁN Bernadette, SZÉLL Márta, KARCAGI Veronika, ZÁDORI Dénes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Background – Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, progressive neuromuscular disorder resulting in a loss of lower motoneurons. Recently, new disease-modifying treatments (two drugs for splicing modification of SMN2 and one for SMN1 gene replacement) have become available. Purpose – The new drugs change the progression of SMA with neonatal and childhood onset. Increasing amount of data are available about the effects of these drugs in adult patients with SMA. In this article, we summarize the available data of new SMA therapies in adult patients. Methods – Members of the Executive Committee of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenetic Society surveyed the literature for palliative treatments, randomized controlled trials, and retrospective and prospective studies using disease modifying therapies in adult patients with SMA. Patients – We evaluated the outcomes of studies focused on treatments of adult patients mainly with SMA II and III. In this paper, we present our consensus statement in nine points covering palliative care, technical, medical and safety considerations, patient selection, and long-term monitoring of adult patients with SMA. This consensus statement aims to support the most efficient management of adult patients with SMA, and provides information about treatment efficacy and safety to be considered during personalized therapy. It also highlights open questions needed to be answered in future. Using this recommendation in clinical practice can result in optimization of therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Rehabilitation results after severe traumatic brain injury ]

DÉNES Zoltán, MASÁT Orsolya

[To assess the rehabilitation outcome after severe traumatic brain injury. Retrospective evaluation of the rehabilitation process and prospective follow-up five years after discharge. Patients – Patients treated in 2013 at the Traumatic Brain Injury Unit, National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation were included in the study (n = 232). Ninety-nine of 232 patients were treated with severe traumatic brain injury. Data were available for 66/99 patients (67%). Fifty patients (13 women and 37 men) were successfully contacted for follow-up (51%), three patients deceased. The mean age of the patients was 42 years (range: 22-72). The majority of them (36/50) was injured in traffic accidents. The mean duration of coma and post-traumatic amnesia were 19 (1-90) and 45 days (5-150), respectively. Patients were admitted for rehabilitation on the 44th (11-111) day after the injury and were rehabilitated for 95 days (10-335). Thirty-eight patients became independent at daily living activity during the rehabilitation period, and none during the follow-up. Two patients needed moderate and one a little help for the daily life. After successful rehabilitation 4 patients continued their higher education, 24 patients worked (six in sheltered, six in the original, 12 in other workplaces). Twenty-two patients did not have permanent jobs, two of whom were retired. The majority of the patients were successfully reintegrated into society. More than half of the patients returned to work or continued their studies. These successes were greatly facilitated by the 40 years of experience and the multidisciplinary team working in the National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation. ]

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[Current questions of multiple sclerosis: the secunder progressive form of the disease]

VÉCSEI László

[Recent data suggest that long-term worsening is common in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and is largely independent of relapses or new lesion formation on brain MRI. The current definition of secunder progressive multiple sclerosis is worsening of disability independent of relapses over at least 6-month interval. Early focal inflammatory disease activity and spinal cord lesion are predictors of very-long term disease outcomes in relapse - onset multiple sclerosis. The potential of PET imaging to visualize hidden inflammation in MS brain in vivo is an important contribution for better understanding the progression of the disease. Therefore, PET imaging is a promising tool in detecting the conversion from relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis to secunder progressive form of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, neuro-axonal damage is the pathological substrate of permanent disability in different neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis. The neurofilament proteins have promise in this context because their levels rise upon neuro-axonal damage not only in the cerebrospinal fluid but also in blood. Patients with increased serum levels of neurofilament at baseline, independent of other clinical and MRI variables, experience significantly more brain and spinal cord volume loss over 2 years and 5 years of follow-up. The kynurenine-pathway abnormalities may be associated with the swich from early-mild stage multiple sclerosis to debilitating progressive forms of the disease. Analysis of these metabolites in serum may have application as multiple sclerosis disease biomarkers. Free radical action has been suggested as a causal factor in the illness. Increased free radical production and consumption of the scavenger molecules were found during the active phase of the disease. Based on the clinical findings (EXPAND Study) and pathomechanism of the disease siponimod is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsing remitting forms of multiple sclerosis, to include secunder progressive multiple sclerosis with active disease, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome.]