Clinical Neuroscience

[Tension type headache and its treatment possibilities]

ERTSEY Csaba1, MAGYAR Máté1,2, GYÜRE Tamás2, BALOGH Eszter2,3, BOZSIK György1

JANUARY 30, 2019

Clinical Neuroscience - 2019;72(01-02)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.72.0013

[Tension type headache, the most common type of primary headaches, affects approximately 80% of the population. Mainly because of its high prevalence, the socio-economic consequences of tension type headache are significant. The pain in tension type headache is usually bilateral, mild to moderate, is of a pressing or tightening quality, and is not accompanied by other symptoms. Patients with frequent or daily occurrence of tension type headache may experience significant distress because of the condition. The two main therapeutic avenues of tension type headache are acute and prophylactic treatment. Simple or combined analgesics are the mainstay of acute treatment. Prophylactic treatment is needed in case of attacks that are frequent and/or difficult to treat. The first drugs of choice as preventatives of tension type headache are tricyclic antidepressants, with a special focus on amitriptyline, the efficacy of which having been documented in multiple double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Among other antidepressants, the efficacy of mirtazapine and venlafaxine has been documented. There is weaker evidence about the efficacy of gabapentine, topiramate, and tizanidin. Non-pharmacological prophylactic methods of tension type headache with a documented efficacy include certain types of psychotherapy and acupuncture. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, ÁOK, Neurológiai Klinika, Budapest
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem, Szentágothai János Idegtudományi Doktori Iskola, Budapest
  3. Nyírô Gyula Országos Pszichiátriai és Addiktológiai Intézet, Neurológiai Osztály, Budapest

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