Clinical Neuroscience

[Some thoughts about the presumed death of classical neurology and the neurology to come]

ERTSEY Csaba

JANUARY 30, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(01-02)

[In my opinion Hungarian medicine, and not just neurology, is in a critical state. This is the consequence of various factors, such as the overemphasizing of medicine’s economic aspects, the malfunctions of patient care caused by inadequate source allocation, and the misinterpretation of the doctors’ role by the society. The vastly increased knowledge base and the huge amount of information we can gather about our patients are an unparalleled chance, rather than a deathly wound, for neurology as a discipline. The challenge the future’s neurology has to face is high-quality patient care, which necessitates dedicating the necessary time for patients, rationally using our ever-increasing diagnostic arsenal, and continuously updating our knowledge about the therapeutic possibilities.]

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