Clinical Neuroscience

[Society of Környey’s Fellows]

CZOPF József

MARCH 10, 2005

Clinical Neuroscience - 2005;58(03-04)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Primary prevention program of the Hungarian Spine Society - Part I. Scientific background of the posture correction exercise scheme]

GARDI Zsuzsa, FESZTHAMMER Artúrné, DARABOSNÉ Tim Irma, TÓTHNÉ Steinhausz Viktória, SOMHEGYI Annamária, VARGA Péter Pál

[The primary prevention program of the Hungarian Spine Society aims to increase awareness of the need to develop and automatically maintain a biomechanically correct posture for all school children. The biomechanically correct posture is a dynamic balance based on a correct middle position of the pelvis and on muscle balance. In this position three important anatomical points - the left and right anterior superior iliac spines and the upper medial point of the pubic bone - form one frontal plane. From side-view the imaginary weight median of the body crosses the 2nd to 5th lumbar and the 2nd to 5th cervical vertebral bodies. When the muscles involved in posture are in balance, their strength and flexibility are just appropriate for the almost continuous work required against gravity. In case of static and/or dynamic under- or overload tonic muscles become shortened, and phasic muscles become stretched, and are no longer able to work optimally. Since many muscles and muscle parts that are involved in normal posture maintenance are not satisfactorily challenged in regular physical exercises and sport activities, the preventive exercise scheme of the Hungarian Spine Society aimed to involve these rarely used muscles in special strengthening and stretching exercises. The scheme is based on 12 test exercises that assess the strength and flexibility of postural muscles. A person who is able to do all test exercises correctly has no problem with his or her muscle balance. In order to counteract the harm caused by sedentary lifestyle already in childhood, regular use of this posture correction scheme in physical education starting from preschool throughout the school-years is recommended for all children.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Clinical neurosciences for efficient treatment - 2nd Live Issue of Clinical Neuroscience/ Ideggyógyászati Szemle]

RAJNA Péter

[Clinical neurosciences for efficient treatment - 2nd Live Issue of Clinical Neuroscience/ Ideggyógyászati Szemle 2005;58(03-04)]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CLINICO-PATHOLOGY AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF BINSWANGER’S DISEASE]

KOVÁCS Tibor, SZIRMAI Imre, PAPP Mátyás

[Pathologically, Binswanger’s disease is subcortical periventricular leucoencephalopathy sparing the U fibers. Clinically it is characterised by executive dysfunction, gait problems, urinary incontinence, pseudobulbar palsy, mood disturbances and dementia. The pathomechanism of Binswanger’s disease is unclear. It is hypothesized that it results from an ischemic-hypoxic injury of the periventricular white matter, which, in turn, can be caused by a sclerotic elongation of the medullary arteries, widening of the perivascular spaces or decreased brain perfusion due to hypotension or heart disease. The symptoms of Binswanger’s disease frequently overlap with those of normal pressure hydrocephalus, vascular parkinsonism and Alzheimer’s disease. A diagnostic criterion of Binswanger’s disease is radiologically demonstrated leukoaraiosis, which, on the other hand, is not equivalent with Binswanger’s disease. A good clinical response after lumbar puncture or shunt implantation might lead to confusion with normal pressure hydrocephalus, which further complicates the clinical diagnosis. It is likely that among the above mentioned disorders there are a number of transitional forms and overlaps, which might be explained by the common pathomechanism of disturbance in cerebrospinal fluid circulation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Supplementary sensory-motor seizures - symptomatology, etiology, and surgical management with illustrative case reports]

HALÁSZ Péter, JUHOS Vera, ERÕSS Loránd, TÓTH Szabolcs, BALOGH Attila, GYÖRGY Ilona, BARSI Péter, KELEMEN Anna, BARCS Gábor

[In the past decade, owing to the advance of epilepsy surgery, growing knowledge has accumulated on the role of the supplementary motor area, described by Penfield and coworkers in the early fifties, in movement regulation and on the characteristics of seizures involving this area. In the Hungarian neurological literature this topic - despite its neurophysiological and practical clinical importance - has been hardly touched. The authors, based on their own experience obtained from surgeries performed within the framework of the "Co-operative Epilepsy Surgery Program", describe the electrophysiological features of this area, its role in movement regulation and the symptoms of epileptic seizures stemmed from or spread onto this area. Using cases as illustrations, they demonstrate the reasoning and various algorithms of the multidisciplinary examination necessary to explore the seizure onset zone and the pathways of seizure spread. Details of the surgical solution are also described.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Application of the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite in Debrecen]

MEZEI Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, CSIBA László, CSÉPÁNY Tünde

[Introduction - The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) has been recommended by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society as a new clinical outcome measure. It is based on measurements in three clinical dimensions: leg function/ambulation (timed 25-foot walk), arm function (9-hole peg test), and cognitive function (paced auditory serial addition test). Scores on component measures are converted to standard scores (Z-scores) that reflect patient performance. This method has not yet been introduced into routine clinical practice. Patients and method - MSFC calculation was applied to 17 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (age mean: 37.4±10.8 years; duration of the disease: 5.5±4.9 years, EDSS: 2.7±1.4) seen at the neuroimmunological outpatient clinic to evaluate its usefulness and its correlation with the traditionally applied Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and with patient-reported quality of life. Fifteen patients received immunomodulatory treatment (interferon beta and glatiramer acetate). MSFC and EDSS were measured at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 months, and questionnaires on quality of life were filled in by the patients at 0, 6, 12, 18 months of follow- up. Results - The prospective study confirmed a strong correlation between EDSS and MSFC (Spearman correlation test, p=0.03, 0.004, 0.002, 0.004, 0.0008, 0.002; R=-0.54, -0.66, -0.68, -0.65, -0.73, -0.69) in multiple sclerosis. The MSFC was more sensitive to clinical changes than EDSS. The extent of changes on the two scales correlated only after 18 months (p<0.005, R=-0.65). The arm/hand function was the most sensitive measure for disease progression. There was no correlation between the quality of life and either of the two other clinical parameters. Conclusion - MSFC is a simple method, suitable for followup of multiple sclerosis patients in everyday clinical practice.]

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Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer and non-Alzheimer dementias

BALÁZS Nóra , BERECZKI Dániel, KOVÁCS Tibor

In aging societies, the morbidity and mortality of dementia is increasing at a significant rate, thereby imposing burden on healthcare, economy and the society as well. Patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life and life expectancy are greatly determined by the early diagnosis and the initiation of available symptomatic treatments. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have been the cornerstones of Alzheimer’s therapy for approximately two decades and over the years, more and more experience has been gained on their use in non-Alzheimer’s dementias too. The aim of our work was to provide a comprehensive summary about the use of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and non-Alzheimers’s dementias.

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[Consensus statement of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenic Society about the therapy of adult SMA patients]

BOCZÁN Judit, KLIVÉNYI Péter, KÁLMÁN Bernadette, SZÉLL Márta, KARCAGI Veronika, ZÁDORI Dénes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Background – Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, progressive neuromuscular disorder resulting in a loss of lower motoneurons. Recently, new disease-modifying treatments (two drugs for splicing modification of SMN2 and one for SMN1 gene replacement) have become available. Purpose – The new drugs change the progression of SMA with neonatal and childhood onset. Increasing amount of data are available about the effects of these drugs in adult patients with SMA. In this article, we summarize the available data of new SMA therapies in adult patients. Methods – Members of the Executive Committee of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenetic Society surveyed the literature for palliative treatments, randomized controlled trials, and retrospective and prospective studies using disease modifying therapies in adult patients with SMA. Patients – We evaluated the outcomes of studies focused on treatments of adult patients mainly with SMA II and III. In this paper, we present our consensus statement in nine points covering palliative care, technical, medical and safety considerations, patient selection, and long-term monitoring of adult patients with SMA. This consensus statement aims to support the most efficient management of adult patients with SMA, and provides information about treatment efficacy and safety to be considered during personalized therapy. It also highlights open questions needed to be answered in future. Using this recommendation in clinical practice can result in optimization of therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Rehabilitation results after severe traumatic brain injury ]

DÉNES Zoltán, MASÁT Orsolya

[To assess the rehabilitation outcome after severe traumatic brain injury. Retrospective evaluation of the rehabilitation process and prospective follow-up five years after discharge. Patients – Patients treated in 2013 at the Traumatic Brain Injury Unit, National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation were included in the study (n = 232). Ninety-nine of 232 patients were treated with severe traumatic brain injury. Data were available for 66/99 patients (67%). Fifty patients (13 women and 37 men) were successfully contacted for follow-up (51%), three patients deceased. The mean age of the patients was 42 years (range: 22-72). The majority of them (36/50) was injured in traffic accidents. The mean duration of coma and post-traumatic amnesia were 19 (1-90) and 45 days (5-150), respectively. Patients were admitted for rehabilitation on the 44th (11-111) day after the injury and were rehabilitated for 95 days (10-335). Thirty-eight patients became independent at daily living activity during the rehabilitation period, and none during the follow-up. Two patients needed moderate and one a little help for the daily life. After successful rehabilitation 4 patients continued their higher education, 24 patients worked (six in sheltered, six in the original, 12 in other workplaces). Twenty-two patients did not have permanent jobs, two of whom were retired. The majority of the patients were successfully reintegrated into society. More than half of the patients returned to work or continued their studies. These successes were greatly facilitated by the 40 years of experience and the multidisciplinary team working in the National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation. ]

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[Mental and physical health in light of health behaviours among sexual and gender minorities]

GUBÁN Zsuzsanna, CSEKÔ Csilla, SZÉL Zsuzsanna

[In a large proportion the reason behind enlisting both primary and secondary care are psychophysiologic disorders or symp­toms. In this current study we reviewed the literature regarding the physical and mental health of a subpopulation (sexual and gender minorities) and their patterns of health behavior. The literature examined in our study contains publications from January of 2009 to March of 2019. Based on the minority stress theory and the biopsychosocial model, the people from sexual and gender minorities face increased level of stress which affects their health and health behaviour in a negative way. Because of the factors mentioned above this group is more exposed to certain illnesses than the majority society – such conditions are cardiovascular diseases, lung diseases and several types of tumors and cancer. Furthermore the excess stress affects their psychological wellbeing and mental health. Summarizing the literature regarding the health and health behavior of people belonging to sexual and gender minorities our aim was to create an inventory of information for health care workers to help enhance the quality of care the members of these minorities receive. It could also support developement of cultural competence for the circle of professionals in education, law enforcement agencies, social care and health care system, in additional it might decreas health inequity.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Guidelines for the treatment of traumatic brain injury - 2017]

BÜKI András, BARZÓ Pál, DEMETER Béla, KANIZSAI Péter, EZER Erzsébet, TÓTH Péter, HORVÁTH Péter, VARGA Csaba

[Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is recognized to be the main cause of death and disability in the first four decades representing a major socio-economical problem worldwide. Recent communications revealed a particularly worrying image about the quality of care for TBI in Hungary. For any improvement a systematic approach characterized by utilization of scientific evidence based guidelines forming the basis for close monitoring of the actual care are considered a prerequisite. In Hungary the first evidence based guidelines in the field of TBI have been issued by the National Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care more than two decades ago followed by joint guidelines of the Hungarian Neurosurgical Society and the Hungarian College of Neurosurgeons. These publications were primarily based on the work of the European Brain Injury Consortium as well as guidelines issued by the Brain Trauma Foundation. Recent renewal of the latter and a need to refresh the outdated national guidelines was met by a call from regulatory authorities to issue the updated version of the Hungarian TBI-guidelines. The present review is aimed to briefly summarize the most fundamental elements of the national head injury guidelines that would hopefully be officially issued in a far more detailed format soon.]