Clinical Neuroscience

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DECEMBER 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(11-12)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[The use of ECT for epileptic patient]

FARKAS Márta, BARAN Brigitta, KÁRPÁTI Róbert, RAJNA Péter

[Psychiatric disorders which indicate the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) also occur in epileptic patients, but there is a lack of medical authority concerning the use of ECT in epileptic patients. This is surprising because in recent years it has been proved that ECT has an anti-convulsive effect to some degree. A case study of an epileptic patient is presented whose progress has been monitored for several years. Antiepileptic drugs were seemingly able to control his epilepsy but at the same time progressive behavioural disturbance (schizophreniform psychosis) accompanied by agitation and violent behaviour developed. Considering the recurrent psychotic decompensations and the relative ineffectiveness of antipsychotics, the authors decided to administer ECT. As a result they were able to bring about the longest symptom free balanced period in the patient. According to the data based on previous medical studies and the experience they can suppose that ECT is not immediately contraindicated by the presence of epilepsy with active interictal focus if the psychopathological condition makes it necessary. In view of the epileptogenic risk factors of classical neuroleptics, the epileptogenic effects of accompanying psychosis and the probable anticonvulsive potential of ECT in cases of severe psychiatric complications accompanying epilepsy ECT could be used more frequently.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Recent advances in Parkinson’s disease]

VÉCSEI László

Clinical Neuroscience

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[Congress calendar 2002;55(11-12)]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The efficacy of autologous free fat graft and Spongostan in preventing postmicrodiscectomy scar formation]

LAPIS István, HORVÁTH Gyõzõ

[Introduction - Postoperative scar formation has been implicated as one of the possible cause of persistent or recurrent pain after spine surgery. The efficacy of the autologous free fat graft and the Spongostan gel foam for the prevention of extradural adhesion after lumbar discectomy was investigated by the evaluation of postoperative neurological symptomps and visual analogue scale. Patients and methods - In the study 174 patients were involved, average 14.5 months after the intervention. Autologous free fat graft (group I) and Spongostan gel foam (group II) was used randomly by the operations. Patients were operated by the same surgeon, and they were investigated by another independent surgeon. Result - No significant difference was found between the two groups.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The role of transcranial magnetic stimulation in clinical diagnosis: facial nerve neurography]

ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna, SIMÓ Magdolna

[Facial nerve neurography involving magnetic stimulation techniques can be used to assess the intracranial segment of the facial nerve and the entire facial motor pathway, as opposed to the traditional neurography, involving only extracranial electric stimulation of the nerve. Both our own experience and data published in the literature underline the value of the method in localising facial nerve dysfunction and its role in clinical diagnosis. It is non-invasive and easy to perform. Canalicular hypoexcitability has proved to be the most useful and sensitive parameter, which indicates the dysfunction of the nerve between the brain stem and the facial canal. This is an electrophysiological finding which offers for the first time positive criteria for the diagnosis of Bell’s palsy. The absence of canalicular hypoexcitability practically excludes the possibility of Bell’s palsy. The technique is also able to demonstrate subclinical dysfunction of the nerve, which can be of considerable help in the etiological diagnosis of facial palsies. For example, in a situation where clinically unilateral facial weakness is observed, but facial nerve neurography demonstrates bilateral involvement, etiologies other than Bell’s palsy are more likely, such as Lyme’s disease, Guillain-Barré syndrome, meningeal affections etc. Furthermore, the technique differentiates reliably between peripheral facial nerve lesion involving the segment in the brain stem or the segment after leaving the brainstem.]

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Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer and non-Alzheimer dementias

BALÁZS Nóra , BERECZKI Dániel, KOVÁCS Tibor

In aging societies, the morbidity and mortality of dementia is increasing at a significant rate, thereby imposing burden on healthcare, economy and the society as well. Patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life and life expectancy are greatly determined by the early diagnosis and the initiation of available symptomatic treatments. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have been the cornerstones of Alzheimer’s therapy for approximately two decades and over the years, more and more experience has been gained on their use in non-Alzheimer’s dementias too. The aim of our work was to provide a comprehensive summary about the use of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and non-Alzheimers’s dementias.

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[Burnout and depression among healthcare nursing staff]

IRINYI Tamás, NÉMETH Anikó

[The aim was to assess the levels of burnout and depressive symptoms among nursing staff members. We designed an online questionnaire for the present cross-sectional study, which was filled out by 10 285 participants between 01-27-2022 and 02-14-2022. The mean score of burnout showed a decrease compared to the score measured in 2021; however, the percent of nursing staff members suffering from burnout is still high (64.4%), from which 42% indicates severe burnout which would requires treatment. Concerning depressive symptoms, 57.8% of participants did not indicate the presence of depression, the rest presented different levels of depressive symptoms (6.8% showed severe depressive symptoms). Currently patients’ chance of recovery is under the expected level of what our healthcare system could provide, which is partially due to the affected mental state of healthcare nursing staff.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Consensus statement of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenic Society about the therapy of adult SMA patients]

BOCZÁN Judit, KLIVÉNYI Péter, KÁLMÁN Bernadette, SZÉLL Márta, KARCAGI Veronika, ZÁDORI Dénes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Background – Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive, progressive neuromuscular disorder resulting in a loss of lower motoneurons. Recently, new disease-modifying treatments (two drugs for splicing modification of SMN2 and one for SMN1 gene replacement) have become available. Purpose – The new drugs change the progression of SMA with neonatal and childhood onset. Increasing amount of data are available about the effects of these drugs in adult patients with SMA. In this article, we summarize the available data of new SMA therapies in adult patients. Methods – Members of the Executive Committee of the Hungarian Clinical Neurogenetic Society surveyed the literature for palliative treatments, randomized controlled trials, and retrospective and prospective studies using disease modifying therapies in adult patients with SMA. Patients – We evaluated the outcomes of studies focused on treatments of adult patients mainly with SMA II and III. In this paper, we present our consensus statement in nine points covering palliative care, technical, medical and safety considerations, patient selection, and long-term monitoring of adult patients with SMA. This consensus statement aims to support the most efficient management of adult patients with SMA, and provides information about treatment efficacy and safety to be considered during personalized therapy. It also highlights open questions needed to be answered in future. Using this recommendation in clinical practice can result in optimization of therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Rehabilitation results after severe traumatic brain injury ]

DÉNES Zoltán, MASÁT Orsolya

[To assess the rehabilitation outcome after severe traumatic brain injury. Retrospective evaluation of the rehabilitation process and prospective follow-up five years after discharge. Patients – Patients treated in 2013 at the Traumatic Brain Injury Unit, National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation were included in the study (n = 232). Ninety-nine of 232 patients were treated with severe traumatic brain injury. Data were available for 66/99 patients (67%). Fifty patients (13 women and 37 men) were successfully contacted for follow-up (51%), three patients deceased. The mean age of the patients was 42 years (range: 22-72). The majority of them (36/50) was injured in traffic accidents. The mean duration of coma and post-traumatic amnesia were 19 (1-90) and 45 days (5-150), respectively. Patients were admitted for rehabilitation on the 44th (11-111) day after the injury and were rehabilitated for 95 days (10-335). Thirty-eight patients became independent at daily living activity during the rehabilitation period, and none during the follow-up. Two patients needed moderate and one a little help for the daily life. After successful rehabilitation 4 patients continued their higher education, 24 patients worked (six in sheltered, six in the original, 12 in other workplaces). Twenty-two patients did not have permanent jobs, two of whom were retired. The majority of the patients were successfully reintegrated into society. More than half of the patients returned to work or continued their studies. These successes were greatly facilitated by the 40 years of experience and the multidisciplinary team working in the National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Disease burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and their caregivers]

PÉNTEK Márta, HERCZEGFALVI Ágnes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit, SZŐNYI László Pál, KOSZTOLÁNYI György, PFLIEGLER György, MELEGH Béla, BONCZ Imre, BRODSZKY Valentin, BAJI Petra, SZEGEDI Márta, POGÁNY Gábor, GULÁCSI László

[Background and purpose - Data on the disease burden of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy are scarce in Hungary. The aim of this study was to assess patients’ and their caregivers’ health related quality of life and healthcare utilisations. Methods - A cross sectional survey was performed as part of the European BURQOL-RD project. The EQ-5D-5L and Barthel Index questionnaires were applied, health care utilisations and patients’ informal carers were surveyed. Results - One symptomatic female carer, 50 children (boys 94%) and six adult patients (five males) participated in the study, the latter two subgroups were included in the analysis. The average age was 9.7 (SD=4.6) and 24.3 (SD=9.8) years, respectively. Median age at time of diagnosis was three years. The average EQ-5D score among children and adults was 0.198 (SD=0.417) and 0.244 (SD=0.322), respectively, the Barthel Index was 57.6 (SD=29.9) and 53.0 (SD=36.5). Score of satisfaction with healthcare (10-point Likert-scale) was mean 5.3 (SD=2.1) and 5.3 (SD=2.9). 15 children were hospitalised in the past 12 months for mean 12.9 (SD=24.5) days. Two patients received help from professional carer. 25 children (mean age 11.1, SD=4.4 years) were helped/supervisied by principal informal carer (parent) for mean 90.1 (SD=44.4) hours/week and further family members helped in 21 cases. Correlation between EQ-5D and Barthel Index was strong and significant (0.731; p<0.01) as well as with informal care time (-0.770; p<0.01), but correlation with satisfaction with health care was not significant (EQ-5D: 0.241; Barthel Index: 0.219; informal care: -0.142). Conclusion - Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to a significant deterioration in the quality of life of patients. Parents play outstanding role in the care of affected children. This study is the first in the Central and Eastern European region that provides quality of life data in this rare disease for further health economic studies.]