Clinical Neuroscience

[SOCIETY MEMBERS]

AUGUST 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(07-08)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Cerebellar venous anomalies with symptomatic vascular malformations]

KOVÁCS Tibor, PAJOR Péter, BODROGI László, FARSANG Marianna, JUHÁSZ Csaba, SZIRMAI Imre

[Cerebral and cerebellar venous anomalies (previously known as venous angiomas) form the alternative venous drainage of the surrounding nervous tissue because of the un-development of the normal venous system. They are made up of veins with abnormal structure: thick walls, lumens dilated and of irregular calibre that converge radially towards a wide draining vein (caput medusae). They are thought to be a benign condition although they are sometimes associated with cerebellar hemorrhages. Authors report three patients with cerebellar venous anomalies associated either with pontine cavernoma, cerebellar arteriovenous malformation or cerebellar infarct. They illustrate that cerebellar venous anomalies are benign conditions, but their presence might be a marker for additional, pathogenic malformation. It might be difficult to detect the associated malformations even by sophisticated imaging methods, but their presence can modify the treatment options.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The molecular genetic control of bony developmental malformations affecting the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine]

DÁVID Károly, KASÓ Gábor, THOROGOOD Peter V, STEVENS John M, CROCKARD H Alan

[In this review a new interpretation of the origin of bony developmental malformations affecting the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine is presented based on recent advances in the understanding of embryonic development of the spine and its molecular genetic control. Radiographs, CT and MRI scans or CT myelograms of patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome were used for demonstration. Detailed clinical and radiologial analysis of these patients was published earlier [David KM, Stevens JM, Thorogood P, Crockard HA. The dysmorphic cervical spine in Klippel-Feil syndrome: interpretations from developmental biology. Neurosurg Focus 1999;6(6):1.]. Homeotic transformation due to mutations or disturbed expression of Hox genes is a possible mechanism responsible for C1 assimilation. Notochordal defects and/or signalling problems, that result in reduced or impaired Pax-1 gene expression, may underlie vertebral fusions. This, together with asymmetrical distribution of paraxial mesoderm cells and a possible lack of communication across the embryonic mid-line, could cause the asymmetrical fusion patterns. The wide and flattened shape of the fused vertebral bodies, their resemblance to the embryonic cartilaginous vertebrae and the process of progressive bony fusion with age suggest that the fusions occur before or, at the latest, during chondrification of vertebrae. The authors suggest that the aforementioned mechanisms are likely to be, at least in part, responsible for the origin of the bony developmental malformations affecting the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Parkinson's syndrome and cognitive disorders]

SZIRMAI Imre, KOVÁCS Tibor

[The cognitive (executive) ability of patients with Parkinson’s-disease (PD) deteriorates gradually during the progression of the disease. Fluency of speech, word finding, working memory, ability to plan the future and flexibility decline. Cognitive disturbance was found to be proportional with the speech, posture, gait and balance problems and can not be influenced by L-dopa substitution. Apart the dorsal and ventral mesolimbic dopaminergic systems the coerulo-cortical noradrenergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems are also impaired in PD. Subcortical dementia in PD can also be explained by the functional dysability of dorsolateral and anterior cingular circuits. Attention deficit can be explained by the dopamine depletion of cingular cortex. Cortical Lewy bodies, neurofibrillary tangles, neurit plaques and additional vascular pathology should also play a role in cognitive impairment of PD. In several systemic degenerative diseases associating with Parkinson’s syndrome (PS) ie. progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), multiple system atrophy (MSA) dementia can be detected with various severity, therefore the question arises concerning the correlation between cognitive disability and PS. Parkinson syndrome can also develop in frontotemporal dementias (FTD), Alzheimer’s disease and cortical Lewy body disease (CLBD) but no correlation exists between motor disability and severity of dementia. In CLBD dementia can be the initial symptom in 18% of cases but PS can also preceedes the dementia. In PSP profound depletion of other monoaminergic neurotransmitter system was also reported. In FTDs associated with PS degeneration of substantia nigra, locus coeruleus and basal nucleus of Meynert has been reported with increased number of neurofibrillary tangles. In patients with vascular PS (VP) there is generally no tremor and rigidity, but pseudobulbar palsy, dementia, gate disturbance, incontinency appeares; L-dopa treatment is generally ineffective. In VP no cellular loss can be found within the substantia nigra, but leukoaraiosis, lacunae in the white matter and basal ganglia are commonly demonstrated.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The evolution of psychoneuroimmunology]

SOMOGYI István, SZEKERES György, SZENDI István

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

LAM KID

[PAGE OF THE HUNGARIAN SOCIETY OF OSTEOPOROSIS AND OSTEOARTHROLOGY]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The new European ESH/ESC guidelines - Part II. Therapy]

FARSANG Csaba

[The most important features of the new European joint hypertension guidelines of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and European Society of Cardiology became available as lectures at the ESH meeting in Barcelona, in 2018 June, while the publication came out in the Journal of Hypertension and also in the European Heart Journal in August, 2018. Based on the published new guidelines I summarise its most important therapeutic suggestions.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Congress of the European Society of Pediatric Radiology and Postgraduate Course, Dublin]

KISS Regina Judit