Clinical Neuroscience

[Shifting function of working memory in psychotic disorders]

DOMJÁN Nóra, GREMINGER Nóra, DRÓTOS Gergely, JANKA Zoltán, SZENDI István

MARCH 25, 2015

Clinical Neuroscience - 2015;68(03-04)

[Background and aims - Mental disorders with psychotic features are overlapping in many ways and there are a growing number of comparative studies in the last decades regarding this. Cognitive deficit is well underpinned in schizophrenia, but fewer studies are conducted in this area including patients with bipolar affective disorder. Therefore the aim of the present study was to investigate the cognitive performance of these two patient groups and healthy controls. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Task is a very sensitive measure of the shifting function. Schizophrenic patients perform consistently poorer on this task than healthy controls, while there are not much data about individuals with bipolar affective disorder. Methods - The Wisconsin Card Sorting Task and clinical symptom rating scales were administered to 26 patients with schizophrenia, 24 with bipolar affective disorder and 21 healthy controls. Results - Significant differences were found among the performance of the three groups using four different dimensions of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. The schizophrenic group made more perseverative errors and achieved less conceptual level responses and completed fewer categories compared to healthy controls. Patients with schizophrenia were able to complete fewer categories and had fewer conceptual level responses than the bipolar group. No significant differences were observed between patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls. Conclusions - According to these results, patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder showed no similarities on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. Bipolar patients performed the task on the same level as healthy individuals did. The two mental disorders influence cognitive performance differently.]

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[Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the autoimmune, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). There are nine drugs available in Hungary reimbursed by the National Health Insurance Fund of Hungary (OEP) to reduce the activity of the disease, from which seven can be used as first line therapies. We have approximately 20 years of experience with the interferon b-1a/1b and glatiramer-acetate products. Though in case of approximately 30% of the patients using one of the first line drugs, the disease remains active, that we call break-through disease. The reasons for break-through disease could be the insufficient adherence and compliance, the appearance of neutralizing antibodies or the high activity of the disease. One of the oral immunomodulating drugs for MS, teriflunomide, was registered in Europe in 2013. Because of the anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effect of teriflunomide, it can be used for the reduction of the disease activity in the relapsing-remitting course of MS. The effect of teriflunomide was proved in one Phase II. and four Phase III. (TEMSO, TOWER, TENERE, TOPIC) studies. Teriflunomide 14 mg once daily was able to demonstrate in two consecutive placebo-controlled phase 3 clinical trials that significantly reduces the relapse rate (31.5% and 36.3%) and in both studies significantly reduces the sustained disability progression (29.8% and 31.5%) moreover delays the appearance of the clinically definitive MS in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). According to the TENERE study there were no significant differences observed between teriflunomide 14 mg and IFNb-1a s.c. in time to failure and annualized relapse rate but the treatment satisfaction domains of global satisfaction, side-effects and convenience were significantly improved with teriflunomide compared with s.c. IFNb-1a. ]

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[Do previous offences predict violent acts in psychiatric patients? A retrospective study in Hungary]

BARAN Brigitta, SZABÓ Ádám Ferenc, KARA Borbála, KOVÁCS Magdolna, UZONYI Adél, ANTAL Albert, UNGVARI S Gabor, GAZDAG Gábor

[Aim - To investigate the presence of offences in the previous past history of perpetrators of violent acts who have undergone forced medical treatment. Methods - The documentation of all patients released over a 10-year period from the National Institute of Forensic Psychiatry (IMEI) was reviewed. A comparison was drawn between patients who were convicted of any type of offense before the violent act (patients with previous offences-PPO) and those who were not (patients with no previous offences-PNO). Results - Eighty-six (29%) and 208 (71%) patients formed the PPO and PNO groups, respectively. Prior contact with psychiatric services was significantly higher in the PPO group (p=0.038) and this group was also more likely to offend under the influence of a psychoactive substance (p<0.001). Exceptional brutality and other qualifying factors were more frequent in the PNO group (p=0.019). Conclusion - As IMEI is the only forensic institution in Hungary, the picture presented here reflects the situation in the entire country. A recidivism rate of 29% is within the internationally published range. ]

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