Clinical Neuroscience

[Schizophrenia-like psychotic episode in Multiple sclerosis]

SIMÓ Magdolna1, RÓZSA Csilla1, BODROGI László1, TAKÁTS Annamária1

JANUARY 20, 1996

Clinical Neuroscience - 1996;49(01-02)

[A case is presented of a twenty-year-old female with multiple sclerosis. In 1990 the patient had three exacerbations with cerebellar, optic and pyramidal symptoms. After a four-year period of remission she was hospitalized with acute schizophrenia-like psychosis. Acute psychosis is an uncommon manifestation of multiple sclerosis which may cause difficulties in differential diagnosis.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Orvostudományi Egyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Budapest

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