Clinical Neuroscience

[Rehabilitation of communication by computer controlled synthesized speech]

FOLYOVICH András1, VASTAGH Ildikó1, PATAKI László2, CSÜRKI Mária1, PATAKI Klára3

NOVEMBER 20, 1996

Clinical Neuroscience - 1996;49(11-12)

[A method of speech rehabilitation by computer aided synthesized speech is reported. This method is useful in patients with severe dysarthria, dysphonia and motor aphasia, when agraphia and alexia are not present. The improved communication helps the patients to adapt to their milieu and decreases social isolation. A case history is given of a patient who uses this method successfully during her daily activities. The speech therapy was significantly supported by the use of computer for synthesized speech. The 48-year old woman underwent a cardiac operation (implan tation of artificial valve) due to previous myocarditis and mitral insufficiency before the present neurological complication. She suffered multiple ischemic attacks leading to the loss of motor performance of speech.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Orvostudományi Egyetem Neurológiai Klinika
  2. Heim Pál Gyermekkórház Fül-Orr-Gégészeti Osztály
  3. Bárczi Gusztáv Gyógypedagógiai Tanárképző Főiskola, Budapest

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