Clinical Neuroscience

[PROGRESSIVE MULTIFOCAL LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY]

PÁL Endre1, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna1, GÖMÖRI Éva2, KOVÁCS Gábor Géza3, SIMON Gábor4, MARÓDI László5, KOMOLY Sámuel1, ILLÉS Zsolt1

MAY 20, 2007

Clinical Neuroscience - 2007;60(05-06)

[Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a rare disease caused by the reactivation of an opportunistic agent, JC virus almost in every cases in immunodeficient conditions. The disease is characterized by multifocal demyelinating lesions of the central nervous system and causes death within a few months. The authors report two patients: a 67 year-old male treated because of chronic lymphoid leukemia, and a 19 year-old male having a hereditary immunodeficiency, X-linked hyper IgM syndrome. In both cases continuously progressive right, later both hemispheric signs were detected. Cerebrospinal fluid was not helpful. Brain MRI showed bilateral large, white matter lesion. The progression was not influenced by the treatment, finally both patient died ten and six weeks after the appearance of first complaints. The diagnosis was confirmed by brain biopsy and autopsy in both cases. Our cases demonstrate that progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy can develop in various immunodeficiencies.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum, Neurológiai Klinika, Pécs
  2. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Patológiai Intézet, Pécs
  3. Országos Pszichiátriai és Neurológiai Intézet, Neuropatológiai Osztály, Budapest
  4. Szent György Megyei Kórház, Gyermekgyógyászati Osztály, Székesfehérvár
  5. Debreceni Tudományegyetem, Infektológiai és Gyermekimmunológiai Intézet, Debrecen

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[100 years of riddle… X. Jubilee Alzheimer’s disease congress on the 100th anniversary of disease description]

Clinical Neuroscience

[TREATMENT OF SPASTIC UPPER LIMB WITH BOTULINUS TOXIN]

DÉNES Zoltán, FEHÉR Miklós, VÁRKONYI Andrea

[Objective - Examination of the effect of local botulinus toxin treatment on spastic upper limb, on patients with different brain injury. Patients and method - Prospective study in Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit of the National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation in the year 2003 and 2004. Thirteen patients (eight with stroke and five with traumatic brain injury) were treated locally on the spastic upper limb with 100 units botulinus A toxin. Results - Spasticity decreased one or two level on Modified Ashworth Scale, and in nine cases the good result were observed still at the end of 3rd month. No local or other complication was detected. Conclusions - Local treatment with botulinus toxin is an effective and safe method to decrease spasticity on upper limb in patients with different brain injury.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Determining the term of schizencephaly]

KENÉZ József, LEEL-ŐSSY Lóránt

Clinical Neuroscience

[NOVEL CELL-BIOLOGICAL IDEAS DEDUCIBLE FROM MORPHOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS ON “DARK” NEURONS REVISITED]

GALLYAS Ferenc

[The origin, nature and fate of ”dark“ (dramatically shrunken and hyperbasophilic) neurons are century-old problems in both human and experimental neuropathology. Until a few years ago, hardly any cell-biological conclusion had been drawn from their histological investigation. On the basis of light and electron microscopic findings in animal experiments performed during the past few years, my research team has put forward novel ideas concerning 1. the nature of ”dark“ neurons (malfunction of an energystoring gel-structure that is ubiquitously present in all intracellular spaces between the ultrastructural elements), 2. the mechanism of their formation (non-programmed initiation of a whole-cell phase-transition in this gel-structure), 3. their capability of recovery (programmed for some physiological purpose), 4. their death mode (neither necrotic nor apoptotic), and 5. their relationship with the apoptotic cell death (the gel structure in question is programmed for the morphological execution of ontogenetic apoptosis). Based on morphological observations, this paper revisits these ideas in order to bring them to the attention of researchers who are in a position to investigate their validity by means of experimental paradigms other than those used here.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[LATE CONTRALATERAL EPILEPTOGENESIS AFTER INCOMPLETE SURGERY IN TEMPORAL LOBE EPILEPSY FOLLOWED ACROSS 18 YEARS]

HALÁSZ Péter, JANSZKY József, KELEMEN Anna, BARSI Péter, RÁSONYI György

[Objectives - To present evidence of changes in seizure semiology suggesting late contralateral epileptogenesis after incomplete surgery in a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods - The presently 36 year old female patient was followed across 18 years by clinical observation and EEG, and video-EEG monitored before and 18 years after surgery. Results - The patient had complex partial seizures defined by video-EEG which started from the right temporal lobe with an ictal spread to the contralateral (left) temporal lobe. After right amygdalo-hippocampectomy she did not become seizure free. Years after surgery a new type of seizure emerged. Video-EEG monitoring 18 yrs after surgery revealed two seizure types. One started in the right temporal region clinically resembling to the earlier seizures. The new seizure type showed left sided electroclinical pattern. The postoperative MRI detected bilateral hippocampal sclerosis. Side specific memory tasks revealed bilateral hippocampal dysfunctions with subdominant (right) side predominance. Conclusions - The well documented evolution from unilateral to bilateral seizures suggests late contralateral epileptogenesis in which the persisting seizure spread from the primary epileptogenic side and/or the earlier silent contralateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS) may play role. This case show that progressive changes with bilateral involvement may occur during the course of chronic temporal lobe epilepsy.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Experience with natalizumab-treatment at Semmelweis University]

GOMBOS Barbara, ILJICSOV Anna, BARSI Péter, HEGEDÛS Katalin, SIMÓ Magdolna

[Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system. During the last two decades, numerous disease modifying drugs have been introduced for the treatment of the relapsing-remitting form of the disease. Since 2010, natalizumab (NTZ) treatment has been used as a second-line therapy for patients with breakthrough disease. In comparison to conventional immunomodulant drugs, NTZ has a more specific effect in that it prevents the entry of immune cells into the central nervous system without interfering with systemic immune response. The efficacy and the safety of NTZ have been confirmed by several studies. The most severe side-effect of NTZ is progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, which has been associated with an increased incidence in patients with anti-JCV antibody positivity, and in those who have been undergoing NTZ treatment for over two years and who have received prior immunosuppressive therapy. In the present study, our experience with natalizumab treatment of 37 patients at the Department of Neurology of Semmelweis University during the last 6 years is presented. We have observed a significant decrease of disease activity in our patients; in many cases the disease has become inactive both clinically (36/37) and radiologically (34/37). The patients’ quality of life has improved significantly during the treatment. In accordance with the literature, we confirm that NTZ is a highly effective treatment in a carefully selected patient group, and can be administered without significant inconvenience to the patient. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[LADA type diabetes, celiac diasease, cerebellar ataxia and stiff person syndrome. A rare association of autoimmune disorders]

SOÓS Zsuzsanna, SALAMON Mónika, ERDEI Katalin, KASZÁS Nóra, FOLYOVICH András, SZŰCS Anna, BARCS Gábor, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna, SKALICZKI József, VADASDI Károly, WINKLER Gábor

[Celiac disease - in its typical form - is a chronic immunemediated enteropathy with typical clinical symptoms that develops against gliadin content of cereal grains, and is often associated with other autoimmune diseases. In cases of atypical manifestation classic symptoms may be absent or mild, and extra-intestinal symptoms or associated syndromes dominate clinical picture. The authors present a longitudinal follow-up of such a case. A 63-years old woman was diagnosed with epilepsy at the age of 19, and with progressive limb ataxia at the age of 36, which was initially thought to be caused by cerebellar atrophy, later probably by stiff person syndrome. At the age 59, her diabetes mellitus manifested with type 2 diabetic phenotype, but based on GAD positivity later was reclassified as type 1 diabetes. Only the last check-up discovered the celiac disease, retrospectively explaining the entire disease course and neurological symptoms. By presenting this case, the authors would like to draw attention to the fact that one should think of the possibility of celiac disease when cerebellar ataxia, progressive neurological symptoms and diabetes are present at the same time. An early diagnosis may help to delay the progression of disease and help better treatment.]

Clinical Neuroscience

The prevalence of sarcopenia and dynapenia according to stage among Alzheimer-type dementia patients

YAZAR Tamer, YAZAR Olgun Hülya

Aim - In this study, the aim was to identify the prevalence of sarcopenia and dynapenia according to disease stage among Alzheimer-type dementia (AD) patients and collect data to suggest precautions related to reducing the disease load. Method - The study was completed with 127 patients separated into stages according to Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) criteria and 279 healthy volunteers aged 18-39 years and 70-80 years abiding by the exclusion criteria who agreed to participate in the research. Our prospective and cross-sectional study applied the CDR and mini mental test (MMSE) to patients with disorder in more than one cognitive area and possible AD diagnosis according to NINCDS-ADRDA (National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke-Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association) diagnostic criteria. The patient and control groups had skeletal muscle mass index (SMMI), muscle strength and physical performance assessed with sarcopenia diagnosis according to European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) diagnostic criteria. Results - In our study, in parallel with the increase in disease stage of AD patients, the prevalence of sarcopenia (led by severe sarcopenia) and dynapenia was higher compared to a control group of similar age. Conclusion - In chronic, progressive diseases, like AD, identification of changes in parameters, like muscle mass and strength and reductions in physical performance in the early period, is important for identification and to take precautions in the initial stages considering the limitations of the preventive effects of treatment applied after diagnosis of AD.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Current questions of multiple sclerosis: the secunder progressive form of the disease]

VÉCSEI László

[Recent data suggest that long-term worsening is common in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and is largely independent of relapses or new lesion formation on brain MRI. The current definition of secunder progressive multiple sclerosis is worsening of disability independent of relapses over at least 6-month interval. Early focal inflammatory disease activity and spinal cord lesion are predictors of very-long term disease outcomes in relapse - onset multiple sclerosis. The potential of PET imaging to visualize hidden inflammation in MS brain in vivo is an important contribution for better understanding the progression of the disease. Therefore, PET imaging is a promising tool in detecting the conversion from relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis to secunder progressive form of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, neuro-axonal damage is the pathological substrate of permanent disability in different neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis. The neurofilament proteins have promise in this context because their levels rise upon neuro-axonal damage not only in the cerebrospinal fluid but also in blood. Patients with increased serum levels of neurofilament at baseline, independent of other clinical and MRI variables, experience significantly more brain and spinal cord volume loss over 2 years and 5 years of follow-up. The kynurenine-pathway abnormalities may be associated with the swich from early-mild stage multiple sclerosis to debilitating progressive forms of the disease. Analysis of these metabolites in serum may have application as multiple sclerosis disease biomarkers. Free radical action has been suggested as a causal factor in the illness. Increased free radical production and consumption of the scavenger molecules were found during the active phase of the disease. Based on the clinical findings (EXPAND Study) and pathomechanism of the disease siponimod is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsing remitting forms of multiple sclerosis, to include secunder progressive multiple sclerosis with active disease, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome.]