Clinical Neuroscience

[PROGRESSIVE MULTIFOCAL LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY]

PÁL Endre1, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna1, GÖMÖRI Éva2, KOVÁCS Gábor Géza3, SIMON Gábor4, MARÓDI László5, KOMOLY Sámuel1, ILLÉS Zsolt1

MAY 20, 2007

Clinical Neuroscience - 2007;60(05-06)

[Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a rare disease caused by the reactivation of an opportunistic agent, JC virus almost in every cases in immunodeficient conditions. The disease is characterized by multifocal demyelinating lesions of the central nervous system and causes death within a few months. The authors report two patients: a 67 year-old male treated because of chronic lymphoid leukemia, and a 19 year-old male having a hereditary immunodeficiency, X-linked hyper IgM syndrome. In both cases continuously progressive right, later both hemispheric signs were detected. Cerebrospinal fluid was not helpful. Brain MRI showed bilateral large, white matter lesion. The progression was not influenced by the treatment, finally both patient died ten and six weeks after the appearance of first complaints. The diagnosis was confirmed by brain biopsy and autopsy in both cases. Our cases demonstrate that progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy can develop in various immunodeficiencies.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum, Neurológiai Klinika, Pécs
  2. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Patológiai Intézet, Pécs
  3. Országos Pszichiátriai és Neurológiai Intézet, Neuropatológiai Osztály, Budapest
  4. Szent György Megyei Kórház, Gyermekgyógyászati Osztály, Székesfehérvár
  5. Debreceni Tudományegyetem, Infektológiai és Gyermekimmunológiai Intézet, Debrecen

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