Clinical Neuroscience

[Primary prevention program of the Hungarian Spine Society - Part I. Scientific background of the posture correction exercise scheme]

GARDI Zsuzsa1, FESZTHAMMER Artúrné2, DARABOSNÉ Tim Irma2, TÓTHNÉ Steinhausz Viktória3, SOMHEGYI Annamária4, VARGA Péter Pál5

MARCH 10, 2005

Clinical Neuroscience - 2005;58(03-04)

[The primary prevention program of the Hungarian Spine Society aims to increase awareness of the need to develop and automatically maintain a biomechanically correct posture for all school children. The biomechanically correct posture is a dynamic balance based on a correct middle position of the pelvis and on muscle balance. In this position three important anatomical points - the left and right anterior superior iliac spines and the upper medial point of the pubic bone - form one frontal plane. From side-view the imaginary weight median of the body crosses the 2nd to 5th lumbar and the 2nd to 5th cervical vertebral bodies. When the muscles involved in posture are in balance, their strength and flexibility are just appropriate for the almost continuous work required against gravity. In case of static and/or dynamic under- or overload tonic muscles become shortened, and phasic muscles become stretched, and are no longer able to work optimally. Since many muscles and muscle parts that are involved in normal posture maintenance are not satisfactorily challenged in regular physical exercises and sport activities, the preventive exercise scheme of the Hungarian Spine Society aimed to involve these rarely used muscles in special strengthening and stretching exercises. The scheme is based on 12 test exercises that assess the strength and flexibility of postural muscles. A person who is able to do all test exercises correctly has no problem with his or her muscle balance. In order to counteract the harm caused by sedentary lifestyle already in childhood, regular use of this posture correction scheme in physical education starting from preschool throughout the school-years is recommended for all children.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Magyar Gyógytornászok Társasága, Budapest
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem Budapest, Egészségügyi Fõiskolai Kar, Fizioterápiai Tanszék, Budapest
  3. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Egészségügyi Fõiskolai Kar, Zalaegerszegi Képzési Központ, Zalaegerszeg
  4. Egészségügyi, Szociális és Családügyi Minisztérium, Budapest
  5. Gerincgyógyászati Nemzeti Központ, Budapest

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