Clinical Neuroscience

[Pompe disease treated with enzyme replacement therapy in pregnancy]

GROSZ Zoltán1, VÁRDI Visy Katalin2, MOLNÁR Mária Judit1

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

Clinical Neuroscience - 2020;73(09-10)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.73.0339

[Pompe disease is a rare lysosomal storage disease inherited in a recessive manner resulting muscular dystrophy. Due to the lack of the enzyme alpha glucosidase, glycogen accumulates in the cells. In the infantile form of Pompe disease hypotonia and severe cardio-respiratory failure are common leading to death within 2 years if left untreated, while the late-onset form is characterized with limb-girdle and axial muscle weakness accompanied with respiratory dysfunction. Pompe disease has been treated with regular intake of the missing enzyme since 2006, which significantly improved the survival and severity of symptoms in patients of both subtypes. The enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is safe and well tolerated. However, limited data are available on its use in pregnancy. Our goal is to share our experience and review the literature on the safety of enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease during pregnancy and post partum.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, Genomikai Medicina és Ritka Betegségek Intézete Budapest
  2. InspiroMed, Budapest

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