Clinical Neuroscience

[PhD thesis Asphyxia-induced brain oedema formation in newborn pigs: a particular role for histamine]

KOVÁCS József

JULY 10, 2004

Clinical Neuroscience - 2004;57(07-08)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Myasthenia in a patient with sarcoidosis and schizophrenia (in English language)]

RÓZSA Csilla, KIS Gábor, KOMOLY Sámuel

[A 44-year-old male patient was hospitalised with paranoid schizophrenia in 1985. Depot neuroleptic treatment was started which successfully prevented further psychotic relapses for the next ten years. His myasthenia gravis started with bulbar signs in 1997 and the symptoms soon became generalized. The diagnosis of myasthenia gravis was confirmed by electromyography, by positive anticholinesterase test and by the detection of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in the serum. Mediastinal CT examination showed enlarged hilar lymph nodes on the left but no thymic pathology was observed. Mediastinoscopy was performed and biopsies were obtained from the affected nodes. Histology revealed sarcoidosis. The patient suffered respiratory crisis following the thoracic intervention (in September 1998). Combined oral corticosteroid (64 mg methylprednisolone/e.o.d.) and azathioprine (150 mg/day) treatment regimen was initiated and complete remission took place in both the myasthenic symptoms and the sarcoidosis. The follow-up CT scans showed no mediastinal pathology (January 2000). During steroid treatment a transient psychotic relapse occured which was successfully managed by supplemental haloperidol medication added to his regular depot neuroleptics. The patient currently takes 150 mg/day azathioprine and receives 40 mg/month flupentixol depot im. His physical and mental status are stable and he has been completely symptome free in the last 24 months. The association of myasthenia gravis and sarcoidosis is very rare. To our best knowledge no case has been reported of a patient suffering from myasthenia gravis, sarcoidosis, and schizophrenia at the same time.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[“From brain - through mind - to society“ XIII. International Semmelweis Symposium]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Prognosis and classification of hypertensive striatocapsular haemorrhages]

HORNYÁK Csilla, KOVÁCS Tibor, PAJOR Péter, SZIRMAI Imre

[Introduction - Nontraumatic intracerebral haemorrhage accounts for 10 to 15% of all cases of stroke. Patients and method - In our study hypertensive striatocapsular haemorrhages were divided into six types on the basis of arterial territories: posterolateral, lateral, posteromedial, middle, anterior and massive (where the origin of the hemorrhage can not be defined due to the extensive damage of the striatocapsular region) type. We analysed laboratory data, clinical presentations and risk factors as alcoholism, smoking and hypertension of 111 cases. The size of the hematoma, midline shift and severity of ventricular propagation were measured on the acute CT-scan. The effect on the 30-day clinical outcome of these parameters were examined Results and conclusion - According to our results, the most important risk factor of hypertensive intracerebral haemorrhage was chronic alcoholism. Blood cholesterol, triglyceride levels and coagulation status had no effect on the prognosis, but high blood glucose levels Significantly worsen the clinical outcome. In our study, lateral striatocapsular haemorrhage was the most common while middle one was the least common type. The overall mortality is 42%, but differs by the type. The 30-day outcome significantly depends on the type of the haemorrhage, the initial level of consiousness, the size of the haematoma, the severity of ventricular propagation, the midline shift and the blood glucose levels. The clinical outcome proved to be the best in the anterior type, good in the posteromedial and lateral types. The prognosis of the massive type is poor. In our study, the classes and the mortality of the striatocapsular haemorrhages was different from the literature data. The higher mortality in our cohort could be due to the longer follow-up and the severe accompanying diseases of our patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Alcohol as a risk factor for hemorrhagic stroke (in English language)]

SAJJAN Daniel, BERECZKI Dániel

[Purpose - Whereas the protective effect of mild-to-moderate alcohol consumption against ischemic stroke has been well recognized, there is conflicting evidence regarding the link between alcohol consumption and hemorrhagic strokes. The aim of the present study is to summarize the results of case-control and cohort studies published on this issue. Methods - Recent epidemiologic articles on the relationship between alcohol consumption and hemorrhagic stroke were identified by Medline searches limited to title words using the following search terms: ”alcohol AND cerebrovascular dis*”, ”alcohol AND stroke”, ”alcohol AND cerebral hemorrhage” and ”alcohol AND hemorrhagic stroke”. Results - Most case-control and cohort studies either repor-ted only on total strokes or on a combined group of hemorr-hagic strokes including intracerebral as well as subarachnoid hemorrhages. There was a consensus among reports that heavy alcohol consumption was associated with a higher risk of hemorrhagic strokes. Controversy remains regarding the effect of mild-to-moderate alcohol consumption: while some studies reported a protective effect, others found a dose-dependent linear relationship between the amount of alcohol consumed and the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The differential effect of moderate alcohol consumption on hemorrhagic compared to ischemic strokes is mostly attributed to alcohol- and withdrawal- induced sudden elevations of blood pressure, and coagulation disorders. Conclusions - Heavy drinking should be considered as one of the risk factors for hemorrhagic stroke. In contrast to the protective effect of mild-to-moderate alcohol use against ischemic strokes, moderate drinking might result in an increased risk of hemorrhagic strokes.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Differentiation of parkinsonian and essential tremor by the use of electrophysiological methods]

GERTRÚD Tamás, FELYÉR Dénes, MAGYAR András, PÁLVÖLGYI László, TAKÁTS Annamária, SZIRMAI Imre, KAMONDI Anita

[Objective - Tremor is one of the most common movement disorders. Different tremors are induced by central and/or peripheral oscillators. The motor cortex plays a significant role in the generation of parkinsonian tremor but its function in essential tremor is not clear. We examined the effect of motor cortex activation on parkinsonian and essential tremor during movement of the contralateral hand. Our aim was to study the role of interhemispheric motor connections in genesis of different tremors. Patients and methods - We recorded the tremor of nine Parkinson patients and seven patients suffering from essential tremor using accelerometry. After Fast Fourier-transformation of digitized tremor signal we measured the power changes at the peak frequency after flash triggered movement (FM) and self-paced movement (SPM). For control we used flash signal without movement. Results - Peak frequency of parkinsonian and essential tremor was not different. The power decrease of parkinsonian tremor was significant during flash triggered and self-paced movement compared to the effect of flash (pFlash-FM=0.0008; pFlash-SPM=0.002), changes during the different movement protocols were not different (pFM-SPM=0.33). During self-paced movement parkinsonian tremor became significantly smaller than essential tremor (p<0.05). The effect of movement was not significant on the power of essential tremor (p=0.42), probably due to high standard deviation of individual data. Conclusions - Voluntary movement of the contralateral hand decreases parkinsonian tremor suggesting that its generator can be inhibited via the activation of the motor cortex. The diverse reaction of essential tremor may reflect various connections between its generator system and the motor areas, therefore it is not a separate disease entity.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Clinical Neuroscience

[The role of sleep in the relational memory processes ]

CSÁBI Eszter, ZÁMBÓ Ágnes, PROKECZ Lídia

[A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep plays an essential role in the consolidation of different memory systems, but less is known about the beneficial effect of sleep on relational memory processes and the recognition of emotional facial expressions, however, it is a fundamental cognitive skill in human everyday life. Thus, the study aims to investigate the effect of timing of learning and the role of sleep in relational memory processes. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. Our results suggest that the timing of learning and sleep plays an important role in the stabilizing process of memory representation to resist against forgetting.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Diagnosis and treatment of microvascular coronary heart disease. Specialities of conditions in Hungary]

SZAUDER Ipoly

[Invasive investigations show that in two-thirds of patients the myocardial ischaemia persists without obstructive coronary disease and any other heart conditions (INOCA). The underlying cause may be microvascular dysfunction (CMD) with consecutive microvascular coronary disease (MVD) and microvascular or epicardial vasospastic angina (MVA). The modern practice of clinical cardiology while using the developed non-invasive cardiac imaging permits exact measuring of the coronary flow with its characteristic indices. All of these improve the diagnosing of CMD-induced myocardial ischemia and provide opportunity to determine primary MVD cases. Since the recognition and treatment of MVD is significantly underrep­resented in the Hungarian medical care, the primary stable microvascular angina (MVA) is described in detail below with its modern invasive and non-invasive differential diagnosis and treatment, concerning especially its frequency provoked by high blood pressure and female coronary heart diseases. There are highlighted all recommended diagnostic procedures available under domestic conditions.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Second game, 37th move and Fourth game 78th move]

VOKÓ Zoltán

[What has Go to do with making clinical decisions? One of the greatest intellectual challenges of bedside medicine is making decisions under uncertainty. Besides the psychological traps of traditionally intuitive and heuristic medical decision making, lack of information, scarce resources and characteristics of doctor-patient relationship contribute equally to this uncertainty. Formal, mathematical model based analysis of decisions used widely in developing clinical guidelines and in health technology assessment provides a good tool in theoretical terms to avoid pitfalls of intuitive decision making. Nevertheless it can be hardly used in individual situations and most physicians dislike it as well. This method, however, has its own limitations, especially while tailoring individual decisions, under inclusion of potential lack of input data used for calculations, or its large imprecision, and the low capability of the current mathematical models to represent the full complexity and variability of processes in complex systems. Nevertheless, clinical decision support systems can be helpful in the individual decision making of physicians if they are well integrated in the health information systems, and do not break down the physicians’ autonomy of making decisions. Classical decision support systems are knowledge based and rely on system of rules and problem specific algorithms. They are utilized widely from health administration to image processing. The current information revolution created the so-called artificial intelligence by machine learning methods, i.e. machines can learn indeed. This new generation of artificial intelligence is not based on particular system of rules but on neuronal networks teaching themselves by huge databases and general learning algorithms. This type of artificial intelligence outperforms humans already in certain fields like chess, Go, or aerial combat. Its development is full of challenges and threats, while it presents a technological breakthrough, which cannot be stopped and will transform our world. Its development and application has already started also in the healthcare. Health professionals must participate in this development to steer it into the right direction. Lee Sedol, 18-times Go world champion retired three years after his historical defeat from AlphaGo artificial intelligence, be­cause “Even if I become the No. 1, there is an entity that cannot be defeated”. It is our great luck that we do not need to compete or defeat it, we must ensure instead that it would be safe and trustworthy, and in collaboration with humans this entity would make healthcare more effective and efficient. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Association between cyclothymic affective temperament and hypertension]

NEMCSIK János, BATTA Dóra, KŐRÖSI Beáta, RIHMER Zoltán

[Affective temperaments (cyclothymic, hypertymic, depressive, anxious, irritable) are stable parts of personality and after adolescent only their minor changes are detectable. Their connections with psychopathology is well-described; depressive temperament plays role in major depression, cyclothymic temperament in bipolar II disorder, while hyperthymic temperament in bipolar I disorder. Moreover, scientific data of the last decade suggest, that affective temperaments are also associated with somatic diseases. Cyclothymic temperament is supposed to have the closest connection with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension is higher parallel with the presence of dominant cyclothymic affective temperament and in this condition the frequency of cardiovascular complications in hypertensive patients was also described to be higher. In chronic hypertensive patients cyclothymic temperament score is positively associated with systolic blood pressure and in women with the earlier development of hypertension. The background of these associations is probably based on the more prevalent presence of common risk factors (smoking, obesity, alcoholism) with more pronounced cyclothymic temperament. The scientific importance of the research of the associations of personality traits including affective temperaments with somatic disorders can help in the identification of higher risk patient subgroups.]