Clinical Neuroscience

[Personal comments]

JANSZKY József, RÁSONYI György, BÉKÉS Judit, HOLLÓ András, HALÁSZ Péter

FEBRUARY 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(01-02)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Chemotherapy of recurrent supratentorial malignant gliomas (Phase II study)]

ÁFRA Dénes, SIPOS László, VITANOVICS Dusan

[At the Hungarian National Institute of Neurosurgery 73 recurrent supratentorial malignant tumours were treated by chemotherapy during the last ten years. Chemotherapy was applied after postoperative radiotherapy but in some cases following reoperation only. All cases were clinically and by CT or MRI verified recurrences. Forty-three patients received BCNU-DBD (dibromodulcitol) treatment (23 anaplastic astrocytoma - AA, and 20 glioblastoma multiforme - GM): day 1. BCNU 150 mg/sq.m. in iv. infusion, day 2. dibromdulcitol 1000 mg/sq orally was given. This course was repeated every six weeks, altogether 2-8 times. Sixteen patients with AA responded with complete or partial regression but only 6 did with GM. Median survival was 14 and 7 months, the difference proved to be significant, p=0.0091. PCV combination (procarbazine, CCNU, vincristine) was applied to 16 patients with AA and 14 cases with recurrent oligodendroglioma (O). Treatment started with vincristine 1.5 mg/sq. m. iv. (2.0 mg maximum), the next day CCNU 100 mg/sq.m. was given, followed by procarbazine 60 mg/sq.m. on days 8-22. and finished by the same dose of vincristine on day 30. The course was repeated after one month, mostly six times. Six patients with AA did not respond; in cases of oligodendroglioma all but one responded with complete or partial improvement. It is remarkable that no significant difference was found between the survivals of BCNU-DBD or PCV treated AA patients. Chemotherapy of supratentorial malignant glioma recurrences with nitroso-ureas and their combination proved to be efficacious. It also seems, that in recurrent cases lower grade gliomas show better response rate than glioblastomas.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Treatment of migraine in hypertension and ischemic heart disease]

FICZERE Andrea, CSIBA László

[Migraine is a common disorder with a prevalence of 9-10% in Hungary. Migraine can be accompanied by hypertension and/or ischemic heart disease sometimes in younger patients, but more frequently in the elderly, which is important for therapeutical considerations. The article reviews the literature with special focus on hypertension and coronary heart disease. In the second part, the authors summarize their experiences on headache patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurology in the internet era]

LENGYEL András

Clinical Neuroscience

[Pregnancy and psychiatric disturbances]

SZÁSZ Anna, KOVÁCS Zsuzsanna

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Decisional collisions between evidence and experience based medicine in care of people with epilepsy]

RAJNA Péter

[Background – Based on the literature and his long-term clinical practice the author stresses the main collisions of evidence and experience based medicine in the care of people with epilepsy. Purpose – To see, what are the professional decisions of high responsibility in the epilepsy-care, in whose the relevant clinical research is still lacking or does not give a satisfactory basis. Methods – Following the structure of the Hungarian Guideline the author points the critical situations and decisions. He explains also the causes of the dilemmas: the lack or uncertainty of evidences or the difficulty of scientific investigation of the situation. Results – There are some priorities of experience based medicine in the following areas: definition of epilepsy, classification of seizures, etiology – including genetic background –, role of precipitating and provoking factors. These are able to influence the complex diagnosis. In the pharmacotherapy the choice of the first drug and the optimal algorithm as well as the tasks during the care are also depends on personal experiences sometimes contradictory to the official recommendations. Same can occur in the choice of the non-pharmacological treatments and rehabilitation. Discussion and conclusion – Personal professional experiences (and interests of patients) must be obligatory accessories of evidence based attitude, but for achieving the optimal results, in some situations they replace the official recommendations. Therefore it is very important that the problematic patients do meet experts having necessary experiences and also professional responsibility to help in these decisions. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Illness representation of patiens with migraine and tension headache]

AMANDA Illés, NAGY Beáta Erika

[It’s been proven by many scientific observation that patients describe their diseases both in progression and adaptation in a different manner even though having a similar origin. The reason behind is the various cognitive background. The investigation of this cognitive function may help us understand patients personal reactions better. In 2007 I investigated the effect of three factors (type, understanding and duration of the disease) on illness representation in patients suffering from headache. The patients included were the following three groups: having migraine with aura, migraine without aura and patients with tension headache. I was looking for correlations and differences in disease representations. For this investigation I have used illness representation questionnaires translated and adapted to Hungarian population. The data were obtained in the waiting hall of two headache centres in Debrecen. Although there were no significant correlations in most of the cases, certain tendencies were observed. Understanding of disease representation could be very useful tool in psychological support, psychotherapy for the patients and it could improve their quality of life.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurophobia]

SZIRMAI Imre

[Neurophobia is the fear of neurological diseases. Its main symptom is that medical students and young doctors are not able to utilize their basic neurological knowledge at the bedside. According to statistics, every second student suffers from neurophobia. This attitude could explain why in the last two decades less and less young doctors wanted to become neurologist. Medical students complain that they receive no instructions, and are afraid of loosing their interest and of facing the failure of their competency. The hardship of neurology was explained by the insufficient knowledge of anatomy and the infrequent encounter with patients. Even general practitioners have anxiety about neurological patients. The loss of interest in neurosciences seems to associate with insensitivity of human-centered culture and corruption of empathic thinking. The burnout syndrome of medical doctors and students can be explained by stress, loss of respect, permanent competition, independency that interferes with responsibility, stiff hierarchy of medical society, fear of diagnostic failures and of economical difficulties. The scores of depression in female students were higher than in male. The idea of the “good neurologist” has been changed. The business oriented care, the shortage of time, and the financial restrictions corroded the conventional practice and ceased the vocational idealism. At present, personal teaching is going to transform into impersonal multimedia learning. Because of the drastic change of values, the age of inner-oriented professionals has terminated also in the medicine. Medical doctors follow even less the traditional troll of professional behavior, but according the social demands, they choose their specialization for subsistence. The highly esteemed social status of neurologists and psychiatrists is going to sink in Europe. To reduce neurophobia it would be desirable 1. to introduce neurology training in the early years of medical school; 2. to teach neurology in all semesters, 3. to assure the effective teaching of neuro-anatomy and physiology, 4. to organize more one-to-one teacher-student communication. In the United States, residents participate in teaching during their residency training. To master neurology dedicated teachers are necessary whom neurology residents ought to meet personally with optimal frequency. However, these requirements seem to fail because of the chiefly technical characters of the actual reforms.]

Hungarian Radiology

[The radiohygienic aspects of the interventional radiology]

PELLET Sándor, GICZI Ferenc, GÁSPÁRDY Géza, TEMESI Alfréda

[Interventional radiology is a relatively new and very rapidly developing cost-effective branch of radiology. Its aim to help or to replace surgical procedures and interventions in many cases are life saving, which are performed by imaging modality control (most commonly angiography or fluoroscopy). During interventional radiological procedures the exposure of staff and patients is usually higher, than in conventional radiography or fluoroscopy. Deterministic effects may also occur. The dosimetry can be carried out by film dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry, DAP meters, semiconductor detectors and personal electronic dosimeter. The basis of reduction of radiation exposure is the radiation protection training. An important rule is that reduction of patient exposure is connected with reduction of staff exposure. With the use of appropriate tools and training the most injuries are avoidable.]