Clinical Neuroscience

[Percutaneous procedure for treatment of diseased vertebral bodies with different etiology: vertebroplasty]

KASÓ Gábor, STEFANITS János, KÖVÉR Ferenc, HUDVÁGNER Sándor, DÓCZI Tamás

AUGUST 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(07-08)

[Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a radiologically guided invasive technique consisting of the injection of surgical cement into the diseased vertebral body. The procedure results in immediate pain relief and strengthening of the bone due to the polymerization process of the filling material hardening the vertebral body and preventing further collapse. This method is suitable for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures and of osteolytic vertebral body metastases without neurological signs, in multiple appearance as well. Authors present technical details of the procedure performed by bi-directional fluoroscopy and combined CT-fluoroscopy control as well as short-term experience obtained by treatment of 17 patients.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Application of kinematic parameters for the assessment of impairments due to central motoneuron damage]

FAZEKAS Gábor, FEHÉR Miklós, KOCSIS László, STEFANIK Györgyi, BOROS Zsuzsanna, JURÁK Mihály

[Evidence based medicine requires objective methods for the assessment of status of the patients. The method described by the authors makes it possible to assess motoric impairment of patients in an objective way. It is based on three-dimensional motion analysis. Authors present the case history of two patients with spastic hemiparesis due to central nervous system damage. Changes in motoric impairment were followed by three-dimensional motion analysis. This method can be adapted for the assessment of motor impairment arising from other reasons as well.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neuropsychological outcome following bilateral pallidotomy in patients with Parkinson's disease]

KOSZTOLÁNYI Péter, KÁLLAI János, BALÁS István, KARÁDI Kázmér, DÓCZI Tamás

[Introduction - Although significant improvement of motor function following bilateral pallidotomy for the treatment of Parkinsons's disease has been proved, the cognitive sequalae have not been clearly defined. There are recurrent loops interconnecting specific areas of the frontal cortex and the basal ganglia, suggesting the continuity or complementary functioning between these areas. Patients and methods - Pre- and postoperative cognitive function was evaluated in 19 Parkinsonian patients who underwent bilateral pallidotomy in order to clarify its effects on cognitive function. All patients were evaluated one day before the procedure and 12+ months after surgery using neuropsychological tests (Raven Progressive Matrices and Bergen Facial Recognition Test). Proper performance in these tests requires reasoning, abstraction and spatial memory, involving strongly the frontal functions. These functions could be described in terms of the ”working memory” concept. Hand Mental Rotation Test was used as comparing task not involving frontal functions. Scores were analyzed by Student’s t-test. Results - Modest improvement was observed in these cognitive functions as assessed by Raven Progressive Matrices (p<0.0688) and a significant change in the complex parts of Bergen Facial Recognition Test (p<0.0547; p<0.0468) was also noticed, but no change was registered in mental rotation tasks. Conclusion - Present data revealed that bilateral pallidotomy is associated with modest and long-lasting improvement in tasks involving the ”working memory”.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Investigation of the dopamine dysregulation hypothesis of schizophrenia with neuroimaging techniques]

SZEKERES György, PÁVICS László, JANKA Zoltán

[The most elaborated biochemical concept of schizophrenia is the dopamine hypothesis. However, this classical theory is based on indirect observations. It has recently become possible to study this theory directly by means of advanced functional neuroimaging techniques, the development of specific radioligands and study protocols that are eligible to monitor dynamic changes in the neurotransmitter systems. According to the early concept, the essence of schizophrenia is the hyperactivity of the dopamine system. Nevertheless, this idea has gone through many modifications. In accordance with the modified dopamine hypothesis, the cognitive deficit and negative symptoms are related to the hypoactivity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while the acute phasis of the disease associates with hyperactivity of the ventral striatal elements of the dopaminergic system. Between these dysfunctions there is causality via their exuberant connections. Beyond that, the interactions between the prefrontal and striatal anomalies implicate the involvement of other neurotransmitters than dopamine. Observations from model psychosis induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists and in vivo neuroimaging investigations in humans support primarily the role of glutamatergic system. Our developing knowledge about the neurochemical mechanism of schizophrenia can significantly affect therapeutic strategies as well.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The molecular genetic control of bony developmental malformations affecting the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine]

DÁVID Károly, KASÓ Gábor, THOROGOOD Peter V, STEVENS John M, CROCKARD H Alan

[In this review a new interpretation of the origin of bony developmental malformations affecting the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine is presented based on recent advances in the understanding of embryonic development of the spine and its molecular genetic control. Radiographs, CT and MRI scans or CT myelograms of patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome were used for demonstration. Detailed clinical and radiologial analysis of these patients was published earlier [David KM, Stevens JM, Thorogood P, Crockard HA. The dysmorphic cervical spine in Klippel-Feil syndrome: interpretations from developmental biology. Neurosurg Focus 1999;6(6):1.]. Homeotic transformation due to mutations or disturbed expression of Hox genes is a possible mechanism responsible for C1 assimilation. Notochordal defects and/or signalling problems, that result in reduced or impaired Pax-1 gene expression, may underlie vertebral fusions. This, together with asymmetrical distribution of paraxial mesoderm cells and a possible lack of communication across the embryonic mid-line, could cause the asymmetrical fusion patterns. The wide and flattened shape of the fused vertebral bodies, their resemblance to the embryonic cartilaginous vertebrae and the process of progressive bony fusion with age suggest that the fusions occur before or, at the latest, during chondrification of vertebrae. The authors suggest that the aforementioned mechanisms are likely to be, at least in part, responsible for the origin of the bony developmental malformations affecting the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

LAM KID

[Morphometric vertebral fractures in the clinical practice]

SZABÓ Tamás, KORÁNYI András, DEÁK Eszter

[The authors surveyed the international literature concerning the prevalence and importance of osteoporotic vertebral fractures, then presented the modern diagnostic techniques (semiquantitative visual and quantitative morphometry, densitometry). These data indicates that plain X-rays, commonly used in everyday practice, underestimate the prevalence of vertebral fractures, therefore morphometric methods are also needed for more accurate fracture risk assessment.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Initial clinical experience with radio-frequency assisted percutaneous vertebral augmentation in the treatment of vertebral compression fractures]

MAROSFŐI Miklós, KULCSÁR Zsolt, BERENTEI Zsolt, GUBUCZ István, SZIKORA István

[Purpose - Percutaenous Vertebroplasty (PVP) is effective in alleviating pain and facilitating early mobilization following vertebral compression fractures. The relatively high risk of extravertebral leakage due to uncontrolled delivery of low viscosity bone cement is an inherent limitation of the technique. The aim of this research is to investigate the ability of controlled cement delivery in decreasing the rate of such complications by applying radiofrequency heating to regulate cement viscosity. Method and material - Thirty two vetebrae were treated in 28 patients as part of an Ethics Committee approved multicenter clinical trial using RadioFreqency assisted Percutaenous Vertebral Augmentation (RF-PVA) technique. This technique is injecting low viscosity polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement using a pressure controlled hydraulic pump and applying radiofrequency heating to increase cement viscosity prior to entering the vertebral body. All patients were screened for any cement leakage by X-ray and CT scan. The intensity of pain was recorded on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the level of physical activiy on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) prior to, one day, one month and three months following procedure. Results - All procedures were technically successful. There were no clinical complication, intraspinal or intraforaminal cement leakage. In nine cases (29%) a small amount of PMMA entered the intervertebral space through the broken end plate. Intensity of pain by VAS was reduced from a mean of 7.0 to 2.5 and physical inactivity dropped on the ODI from 52% to 23% three months following treatment. Conclusion - In this small series controlled cement injection using RF-PVA was capable of preventing clinically hazardous extravertebral cement leakage while achieving outcomes similar to that of conventional vertebroplasty.]

LAM KID

[Adherence of Hungarian postmenopausal women with osteoporosis]

LAKATOS Péter, TÓTH Emese, LANG Zsolt, NAGY Bence, SZEKERES László, TAKÁCS István

[INTRODUCTION - Osteoporosis is defined as a loss of bone tissue and bone mass that leads to a compromised trength and quality of bones and thus to an increased risk of fractures. In many women, menopausal hormonal changes are associated with an increased bone loss. This population has postmenopausal osteoporosis. The essence of osteporosis treatment is the adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation, which, if needed, might be combined with drug therapy to inhibit the process of bone loss. METHODS - We assessed the adherence to therapy of Hungarian patients and its effect on the risk of bone fractures, using data recorded by the National Health Insurance Fund Administration between 2004 and 2010 (n=223068, mean age: 69.9 years). We performed a statistical analyses of the available data. Medication possession ratio (MPR) for each treatment and the ratio of patients receiving continuous treatment in the study period (for 12, 18 and 24 months) were estimated. Medication persistence was investigated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the factors influencing the risk of fracture. RESULTS, CONCLUSION - The results of our study show that medication adherence to treatment is low among Hungarian patients [mean MPR: 57.9%; 95% CI (57.7%- 58.0%) and persistence rate: 32.4%; 95% CI (32.2%-32.6%) in the first year]. These parameters are substantially influenced by the administration route and the frequency of treatments [mean MPR ranged 41.5%- 100% and persistence rates ranged 18.8%- 100% in the first year, differences between subgroups were significant (p<0,05)]. Our compliance as well as persistance studies showed that parenteral administration had more beneficial effects. Confirming our preliminary hypotheses, the improvement of patient compliance significantly reduced fracture risk (good compliance was defined as MPR>80%, which was associated with RR: 0.57, p<0.05 for fracture risk). Further improvement might be achieved by parenteral administration [RR for fracture risk 0.60 compared with non-compliant patients and 0.44 compared with compliant subgroups treated with oral and parenteral medications (p<0.05)].]

Ca&Bone

[Management of hip fractures: practice, results, and problems in the last decade]

KRICSFALUSY Mihály, FLÓRIS István, CSERHÁTI Péter

[Among fractures attributable to osteoporosis, hip fractures are associated with the most severe consequences and the greatest costs. Surgical therapy for this condition is continuing to improve. Increasingly recent implants and techniques are being developed and introduced to successfully control postoperative adverse events. The authors briefly outline actual practice in Hungary and present some results of the follow-up of their patients in the last decade. These show that, in order to improve outcomes of hip fracture patients, all domains of management need to be addressed.]

Ca&Bone

[Denosumab - pharmacokinetic and clinical evidences]

MÉSZÁROS SZILVIA

[Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody to RANKL modifying bone resorption in a rapid, sustained and reversible way. In postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density, denosumab 60 mg every 6 months increased mineral density, and reduced bone turnover. In postmenopausal women, it reduced the risk of vertebral, hip, and non-vertebral fractures. Increase in body mass index and reduction in bone turnover was more pronounced with denosumab than with alendronate. In patients who were switched from alendronate to denosumab, positive effects on bone were more pronounced than in those continuing alendronate. Denosumab was safe and well tolerated, and it holds the promise of becoming an efficacious therapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis.]