Clinical Neuroscience

[Pediatric intraventricular tumors]

MARKIA Balázs, GYORSOK Zsuzsanna, KORDÁS Mariann, BOGNÁR László

DECEMBER 20, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(11-12)

[Pediatric intraventricular tumors present a well circumscribed group from surgical point of view. These tumors growing in the ventricular system cause hydrocephalus in most of the cases, the presenting symptoms are the signs of raised intracranial pressure. The mass lesion may remain silent for a long period, especially in infancy due to compensatory mechanisms, and the tumor might reach extreme size making the surgery a real challenge. This group has very specific postoperative problems resulting from the disturbance of CSF circulation. In this study we present the retrospective analysis of 55 patient operated for intraventricular tumor in the National Institute of Neurosurgery between 1991 and 2006. Data were analysed regarding histological type, presenting symptoms, type of surgical approach, radicalitiy of the resection and postoperative complications. In addition to our own results brief presentation of the specific histological groups is given based on the available literature.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Devastating epileptic encephalopathypseudoencephalitis: the new type of catastrophe epilepsy in our department]

NEUWIRTH Magdolna, PARAICZ Éva, LIPTAI Zoltán

[Purpose - Analysis of history of our five patients with intractable epilepsy whose illnes have begun with prolonged status epilepticus (SE) and high-grad fever of unknow cause. Methods - Retrospective study analysis of selected five intractable epileptic patients at a median age of 11.5 (8-14) years. Results - All children had normal development before epilepsy begun. Intractable SE lasted 3-10 (median seven) days by four patients and three months by one patient. The cause of illness was unknow at the beginning and the MRI were normal. Intractable epilepsy followed the SE in all cases without any latent period. Follow-up of the children was 3-15 (median 9.5) years. The seizures came continually with few-day-long breaks, antiepileptic drugs were ineffective. Semiology of seizures, EEG, and functional imaging examinations (PET, SPECT) referred to temporal and frontal lobe damages. Later on, the MR images showed hippocampal sclerosis in one patient and mild generalized brain atrophy in the others. During the years, cognitive deterioration and behavioral problems have been realized. The most severe patient developed tetraparesis, fell in vigil coma and died after five years. Conclusions - The symptoms of our patients fulfilled the criteria of devastating epileptic encephalopathy in schoolaged children.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Clinical and genetic diagnosis of dravet syndrome: report of 20 cases]

SIEGLER Zsuzsa, NEUWIRTH Magdolna, HEGYI Márta, PARAICZ Éva, PÁLMAFY Beatrix, TEGZES Andrea, BARSI Péter, KARCAGI Veronika, CLAES Lieve, DE Jonghe Peter, HERCZEGFALVI Ágnes, FOGARASI András

[Objective and background - Severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI; Dravet's syndrome) is a malignant epilepsy syndrome characterized by prolonged febrile hemiconvulsions or generalized seizures starting in the first year of life. Later on myoclonic, atypical absence, and complex partial seizures appear. When one of these seizure forms is lacking the syndrome of borderline SMEI (SMEB) is defined. Psychomotor delay resulting in mental retardation is observed during the second year of life. In most patients a de novo sodium channel alfa-1 subunit (SCN1A) mutation can be identified. By reviewing the clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging data of our SMEI patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2008, we would like to share our experiences in this rare but challenging syndrome. Our results will facilitate the earlier and better diagnosis of Hungarian children with SMEI. Patients and methods - Clinical, EEG, MRI and DNA mutation data of 20 SMEI patients treated in the Bethesda Children’s Hospital (Budapest) were reviewed. Results - The first seizure appeared at age 6.3±3.0 months. At least one of the first two seizures were complex febrile seizures in 19/20 and unilateral seizures in 12/20 children. All children except for one showed hemiconvulsions at least once; all children had seizures lasting longer than 15 minutes. Eight of twenty patients had SMEB. DNA diagnostics identified an SCN1A mutation in 17 patients (6 missense, 4 nonsense, 4 frameshift, 2 splice site, 1 deletion) while 3 children had no mutation. Conclusion - Early diagnosis of SMEI is important for the avoiding unnecessary examinations and false therapies as well as for genetic counselling. Typical symptoms of SMEI are early and prolonged febrile hemiconvulsions with neurological symptoms, mental retardation and secondary seizure types later on. The presence of an SCN1A mutation supports the diagnosis. We propose the availability of molecular diagnostics and stiripentol therapy for SMEI children in Hungary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Convulsions in neonatal period and infancy with rare etiology (neurogenetic disease)]

NAGY Andrea, SZEVER Zsuzsa, KORMOS Zsuzsa, SZÉKELY Emőke, TÓTH EDIT, SMIDÉLIUSZ Lajos, HORVÁTH Rita, KARCAGI Vera, SCHULER Ágnes, JÁVORSZKY Eszter

[Authors summerized the etiology of convulsions in neonatal period and infancy (hypoxy, intracranial hemorrhage, infections of central nervous system, metabolic background, chromosomal abnormalities, brain developmental abnormalities, benign neonatal convulsions, benign neonatal familial convulsions, drug withdrawal, inborn error of metabolism). They suggest screening examinations after convulsion, summerized the basic princpile of tandem examination and review a proposal at suspicion of inborn error of enzym defects (aminoacidemias, defects of fatty acid oxydation, organic acidemias). They present case history of two patients suffered in extraordinary inborn error of enzym defect (SCO2 gene mutation, propionic acidemia). Diagnosis originated in Heim Pál Hospital (settlement Madarász Hospital) with a Hungarian and international cooperation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Screening of hereditary neuromuscular disorders in the roma population living in Hungary]

HERCZEGFALVI Ágnes, PIKÓ Henriett, KARCAGI Veronika

[Recent medical genetic research has identified a number of novel, or previously known, but rare conditions, caused by private founder mutations. The Finnish and Ashkenazi Jew populations provide the best examples for identifying genes in unique genetic disorders. In these populations, research efforts and high-level medical services resulted in intense improvements of medical care and in organization of population- based screening programs. Hereditary disorders of the Roma populations are known for a long time. The genetic background of these diseases has been established by extensive molecular genetic studies. The Romas represent 6% of the Hungarian population and live under extremely bad health conditions. Therefore, our aim was to map the incidence of the hereditary neuromuscular disorders among the Hungarian Roma population. Moreover, we intended to provide proper information, genetic counseling and possible prevention strategies for the families at risk, which should represent a primer task in public health. Because of our experience in neuromuscular disorders, we choose six, frequent, autosomal recessive disorders for these clinical and genetic studies: hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom (HMSNL), hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Russe (HMSNR), congenital cataracts facial dysmorphism syndrome (CCFDN), Limb- Girdle muscular dystrophy 2C (LGMD2C), congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Following identification of the founder mutations, the possibility of prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening for family members will contribute to the decrease of the recurrence risk for these severe, mostly untreatable disorders.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Pneumococcal meningitis in children - 9 1/2-year-experience at Szent László hospital, Budapest, Hungary ]

IVÁDY Balázs, LIPTAI Zoltán, ÚJHELYI Enikő, BALÁZS György

[Background and objective - No recent publications are available about pneumococcal meningitis in Hungarian children. The aim of this study was to collect data of epidemiological, clinical and prognostic features of pneumococcal meningitis in children treated at Szent László Hospital, Budapest, Hungary. Methods - We conducted a retrospective review of medical charts and follow-up records of patients aged 1 to 18 years admitted to our Pediatric and Pediatric Intensive Care Units due to pneumococcal meningitis between 1st Jan 1998 and 30th Jun 2007. Results - 31 children with 34 cases of pneumococcal meningitis were admitted to our hospital in the study period. Two children developed recurrent illness. The mean age was 6 years, 26% were under 1 year of age. The mean duration of hospital stay was 21 days, 97% required intensive care. Frequent clinical symptoms were fever (100%), nuchal rigidity and vomiting (78%), altered mental status (71%), Kernig's and Brudzinski's signs (58%) and seizures (41%). Otitis media, sinusitis, mastoiditis were present in 44%, 58%, 41%, respectively. Subdural effusion, parenchymal cerebral lesion and sinus thrombosis were documented in 5, 3 and 2 cases, respectively. One third of the patients recieved ceftriaxon, two thirds were administered ceftriaxon and vancomycin. Adjunctive therapy with dexamethason was given to 91% of the children. 70% of patients required mechanical ventillation. 9 patients (25%) required endoscopic sinus surgery. In 13 cases (38%) mastoidectomy, in 5 children (15%) neurosurgery was performed. The case fatality rate was 23.5%. 8 (23.5%) patients had mild or moderate, 1 child (3%) developed severe neurological sequelae. Conclusion - Pneumococcal meningitis in children remains a source of substantial morbidity and mortality in childhood. The long hospital stay, the frequent need for intensive care and severe neurologic sequelae emphasize the importance of early diagnosis, early treatment and prevention with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Clinical Neuroscience

Extraskeletal, intradural, non-metastatic Ewing’s sarcoma. Case report

OTTÓFFY Gábor, KOMÁROMY Hedvig

Intracranial localization of Ewing’s sarcoma is considerably very rare. Herein, we present clinical and neuroimaging findings regarding a 4-year-old boy with intracranial Ewing’s sarcoma. He was born prematurely, suffered intraventricular haemorrhage, posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus developed, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted in the newborn period. The patient endured re­gular follow ups, no signs of shunt malfunction nor increased intracranial pressure were observed. The last neuroima­ging examination was performed at 8 months of age. Upon reaching the age of 4 years, repeated vomiting and focal seizures began, and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure were detected. A brain MRI depicted a left frontoparietal space-occupying lesion infiltrating the superior sagittal sinus. The patient underwent a craniotomy resulting in the total excision of the tumour. The histological examination of the tissue revealed a small round blue cell tumour. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of EWSR1 gene translocation with FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization). No additional metastases were detected during the staging examinations. The patient was treated in accordance to the EuroEwing 99 protocol. Today, ten years onward, the patient is tumour and seizure free and has a reasonably high quality of life.

Clinical Neuroscience

Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to a jugular foramen schwannoma

ÖZTOP-CAKMAK Özgür, VANLI-YAVUZ Ebru, AYGÜN Serhat, BASTAN Birgül, EGEMEN Emrah, SOLAROGLU Ihsan, GURSOY-OZDEMIR Yesemin

Introduction – Although the involvement of the hypoglossal nerve together with other cranial nerves is common in several pathological conditions of the brain, particularly the brainstem, isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy is a rare condition and a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation – The presented patient arrived to the hospital with a history of slurred speech and an uncomfortable sensation on his tongue. Neurological examination showed left-sided hemiatrophy of the tongue with fasciculations and deviation towards the left side during protrusion. Based on the clinical and MRI findings, a diagnosis of hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was made. Discussion – Hypoglossal nerve palsy may arise from multiple causes such as trauma, infections, neoplasms, and endocrine, autoimmune and vascular pathologies. In our case, the isolated involvement of the hypoglossal nerve was at the skull base segment, where the damage to the hypoglossal nerve may occur mostly due to metastasis, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, nerve sheath tumors and glomus tumors. Conclusion – Because of the complexity of the region’s anatomy, the patient diagnosed with hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was referred for gamma knife radiosurgery.

Clinical Neuroscience

Acute bilateral drop foot as a complication of prolonged squatting due to haemorrhoid

KOKSAL Ayhan, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye

Drop foot is defined as difficulty of dorsiflexion of the foot and ankle due to weak anterior tibial, extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Cauda equina syndrome, local peroneal nerve damage due to trauma, nerve entrapment, compartment syndrome and tumors are common etiologies. A 32-year-old male patient was applied with difficulty in dorsiflexion of both of his toes, feet and ankles after he had squatted in toilette for 6-7 hours (because of his haemorrhoid) after intense alcohol intake 2 weeks before. Acute, partial, demyelinating lesion in head of fibula segment of peroneal nerves was diagnosed by electromyography. This case was reported since prolonged squatting is an extremely rare cause of acute bilateral peroneal neuropathy. This type of neuropathy is mostly demyelination and has good prognosis with physical therapy and mechanical devices, but surgical intervention may be required due to axonal damage. People such as workers and farmers working in the squatting position for long hours should be advised to change their position as soon as the compression symptoms (numbness, tingling) appear.

Clinical Oncology

[Treatment of locally advanced rectum cancer]

FRÖBE Ana, JURETIC Antonio, BROZIC Marić Jasmina, SOLDIC Zeljko, ZOVAK Mario

[Over the last several decades, local control (LC) for rectal cancer has markedly improved because of advances in surgical technique and the adoption of adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Total mesorectal excision (TME) during surgical resection of localized rectal cancer, which involves removal of the entire circumferential perirectal tissue envelope, decreases rates of both involved surgical margins and local recurrences. Similarly, for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC), including T3 and T4 tumors and lymph node-positive disease, adjuvant and more preferably neoadjuvant CRT has exhibited the ability to both improve disease-free survival (DFS) and LC. Some patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT achieve a complete pathologic response (pCR) to CRT and the oncologic outcomes are particularly favourable in this group. In contrast to improved local control, patients’ overall survival rates are in need of improvement, and the major factor limiting the outcome is the appearance of metachronous distant metastases. The main approach to overcome this issue is the escalation of systemic therapy in the neoadjuvant setting, e.g. by addition of induction or consolidation chemotherapy before or after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (the so-called total neoadjuvant treatment, TNT, approach). The aim was to present a short overview of the role of radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy in the management of rectal cancer with a focus on current treatment stand wasards for locally advanced rectal cancer.]