Clinical Neuroscience

[Non-obstructive hydrocephalus internus with a rare pathogenesis - mucormycosis]

BEREG Edit1, TISZLAVICZ László2, VÖRÖS Erika3, PAPP Tamás4, BARZÓ Pál5

JULY 22, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(07-08)

[The case of a 9-year old boy is presented in this article who developed a rare fungal infection of central nervous system. The histopathologic examination has revealed mucormycosis. The diagnosis wasn’t confirmed microbiologically as the culture and PCR were negativ. After the iv administered Amphotericin B lipid complex the MR images of the brain have improved. The mucormycosis classically develops in immunodeficient patients and presents an acute, fulminant, mostly lethal infection. This case is very unusual, because the chronic, isolated CNS mucormycosis has slowly developed in immuncompetent patient and only one symptom was the long existing headache. The aim of this paper is reporting the case history and to find out the possible way of infection.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ, Gyermekgyógyászati Klinika, Szeged
  2. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ, Patológiai Intézet, Szeged
  3. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ, Radiológiai Klinika, Szeged
  4. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, TTIK Mikrobiológiai Tanszék, Szeged
  5. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Szent-Györgyi Albert Klinikai Központ, Idegsebészeti Klinika, Szeged

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