Clinical Neuroscience

[Newer approaches in self-theories]

TÉNYI Tamás

MARCH 15, 2004

Clinical Neuroscience - 2004;57(03-04)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[12th Annual Meeting of the Hungarian Society of Neuroradiology]

[12th Annual Meeting of the Hungarian Society of Neuroradiology 2004;57(03-04)]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Effect lesions of extrahypothalamic brain structures on testicular functions in rats with special emphasis on asymmetry]

BANCZEROWSKI Péter, GERENDAI Ida

[Introduction - The aim of our studies was to investigate the involvement of extrahypothalamic brain structures in the control of testicular functions with special emphasis on the effect of right- and left-sided structures. Material and method - We performed lesion of the insular cortex, the amygdala, interrupted part of nerve fibers to and from the insular cortex, and cut the major commissural pathway of the brain the corpus callosum in adult male rats and studied the effect of the interventions on testicular steroidogenesis, serum testosterone and gonadotrop hormone concentrations. Results - Following lesion of the insular cortex on the right side serum testosterone level and steroidogenesis of the testes decreased (in the case of the left testis the difference was significant). Similar lesion on the left side did not change the parameters studied. Both right- and left-sided lesion induced a significant increase in serum LH concentration. The effect was more pronounced after right-sided lesion. Interruption of nerve fibers above the amygdala by a paramedian sagittal knife cut on the right or on the left side resulted in opposite effect on testicular steroidogenesis: right-sided intervention increased while left-sided one reduced testosterone secretion. Only left-sided cut influenced (decreased) serum testosterone level. There was no changes in LH concentration. Both right- and left-sided lesion of the amygdala induced a significant decrease in basal testosterone secretion in vitro of both testes and in serum testosterone level. However, serum LH concentration decreased only after left-sided surgery. Interruption of the corpus callosum in animals with leftsided orchidectomy induced a significant rise in steroidogenesis of the remaining (right) testis. Both sham surgery and callosotomy combined with left orchidectomy resulted in a significant increase in serum FSH level. Conclusion - Results of our studies suggest that extrahypothalamic brain structures and interventions influence endocrine functions of the testis through the hypothalamohypophyseal- testicular axis and by a direct neural route.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Report from the UEMS/European Board of Neurology Meeting]

SZIRMAI Imre

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurological aspects of some sleep disorders]

SZŰCS Anna

[My aim is to examine the relation between some sleep disorders and neurological diseases; to analyse their mutual interactions in order to achieve new practical data for clinical use. In the theoretical part I summarise some main points of sleep physiology concentrating on the associations of sleep regulation and neurological diseases. In my examinations, besides clinical methods, the most important tools used are sleep analyses performed by polysomnography and MESAM IV as well as brain imaging methods. To assess clinical state of my stroke patients I utilised NIH Stroke Scale. I found pathological sleep apnoea frequency in more than half of the patients in any type (bleeding/infarction) of acute stroke. In a prospective study, sleep apnoea parameters remain permanent during 3 months in the ischaemic group; on the other hand, sleep apnoea improves during follow up after brain haemorrhages. I showed pathological sleep apnoea frequency in myasthenia gravis among male patients without daytime respiration complaint. I looked for the link between the mechanism of the sleep disorder and the underlying organic lesion in two cases. In this analyses I took into account the function of the affected structure in sleep regulation. I found a basal forebrain tumour, affecting sleep regulating centres underlying severe insomnia and I suggest a neurovascular compression of the lateral preoptic area of the hypothalamus being the reason of sleep related painful erection, a parasomnia of unknown origin.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Epilepsy caused by retrosplenial tumor]

HALÁSZ Péter, JANSZKY József, BÓDIZS Róbert, BARSI Péter, SZŰCS Anna, STEINECKER Katalin

[We present a patient in whom retrosplenial tumour was associated with epileptic symptoms characterized by complex partial seizures and widespread interictal and ictal epileptiform EEG abnormalities The patient had verbal memory deficit symptoms as well. After surgical removal of the tumour (oligoastrocytome) the clinical symptoms and EEG signs disappeared. The characteristics of our patient demonstrate the possible role of the retrosplenial area in widespread epileptic symptoms and in the regulation of secondary bilateral synchrony, in addition to its recently described importance in the memory functions.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: The mirror inside our brain

KRABÓTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Over the second half of the 19th century, numerous theories arose concerning mechanisms involved in understanding of action, imitative learning, language development and theory of mind. These explorations gained new momentum with the discovery of the so called “mirror neurons”. Rizzolatti’s work inspired large groups of scientists seeking explanation in a new and hitherto unexplored area of how we perceive and understand the actions and intentions of others, how we learn through imitation to help our own survival, and what mechanisms have helped us to develop a unique human trait, language. Numerous studies have addressed these questions over the years, gathering information about mirror neurons themselves, their subtypes, the different brain areas involved in the mirror neuron system, their role in the above mentioned mechanisms, and the varying consequences of their dysfunction in human life. In this short review, we summarize the most important theories and discoveries that argue for the existence of the mirror neuron system, and its essential function in normal human life or some pathological conditions.

Clinical Neuroscience

A new method to determine the optimal orientation of Slim Modiolar cochlear implant electrode array insertion

HORVÁTH Bence, PERÉNYI Ádám, MOLNÁR Fiona Anna, CSANÁDY Miklós, KISS József Géza, ROVÓ László

Our goal was to determine the optimal orientation of insertion of the Slim Modiolar electrode and develop an easy-to-use method to aid implantation surgery. In some instances, the electrode arrays cannot be inserted in their full length. This can lead to buckling, interscalar dislocation or tip fold-over. In our opinion, one of the possible reasons of tip fold-over is unfavourable orientation of the electrode array. Our goal was to determine the optimal orientation of the Slim Modiolar electrode array relative to clear surgical landmarks and present our method in one specified case. For the measurement, we used the preoperative CT scan of one of our cochlear implant patients. These images were processed by an open source and free image visualization software: 3D Slicer. In the first step we marked the tip of the incus short process and then created the cochlear view. On this view we drew two straight lines: the first line represented the insertion guide of the cochlear implant and the second line was the orientation marker (winglet). We determined the angle enclosed by winglet and the line between the tip of the incus short process and the cross-section of previously created two lines. For the calculation we used a self-made python code. The result of our algorithm for the angle was 46.6055°. To validate this result, we segmented, from the CT scan, the auditory ossicles and the membranaceous labyrinth. From this segmentation we generated a 3D reconstruction. On the 3D view, we can see the position of the previous lines relative to the anatomical structures. After this we rotated the 3D model together with the lines so that the insertion guide forms a dot. In this view, the angle was measured with ImageJ and the result was 46.599°. We found that our method is easy, fast, and time-efficient. The surgery can be planned individually for each patient, based on their routine preoperative CT scan of the temporal bone, and the implantation procedure can be made safer. In the future we plan to use this method for all cochlear implantation surgeries, where the Slim Modiolar electrode is used.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Interrelations of social phobia, trait anxiety, perfectionism and psychological protective factors in a young female population: Cluster analysis]

DOBOS Bianka, PIKÓ Bettina

[Deterioration of social functions and quality of life and lower level of satisfaction with life are often joining to axiety disorders. Considering the higher prevalence rates across anxiety disorders for women, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship of social phobia with trait anxiety, perfectionism, use of pharmaceuticals, self-efficacy and life satisfaction in a group of young female participants. Online, self-administered questionnaire was used as a method of data collection at different social network sites. The sample consisted of young women aged between 14–35 years (N = 435, M = 27.3 years; SD = 5.9). The questionnaire con­tained items of socio-demographic variables, use of pharmaceuticals as well as mental background variables (Social Pho­bia In­ventory, State-Trait Anxiety In­ven­tory, Mul­ti­dimensional Perfectionism Scale, Ge­neral Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, Sa­tis­faction with Life Scale). Besides correlation analysis, cluster analysis was conducted. rait anxiety shows strong correlation with social phobia, perfectionism and use of pharmaceuticals. After examining all variables three clusters were emerging: 1) high level of trait anxiety with social phobia, moderate perfectionism, low levels of self-effcacy and satisfaction with life; 2) trait anxiety below the average without social phobia, high self-efficacy and satisfaction with life; 3) trait anxiety above the average with moderate phobia, high perfectionism with high self-efficacy and moderate life satisfaction. Results of our study show that social phobia strongly interrelates not only with trait anxiety as a stable part of personality but with self-estimated lower well-being and lack of mental protective factors. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

Psychoneuroimmunology and the embodied mind

SZABÓ Attila

One of the major philosophical aspirations in contemporary consciousness research is to find a framework of explanation that could successfully address the problem of mind-body relations. Descartes is often regarded as the father of dualism in modern philosophy of mind. Phenomenology and embodiment may dissolve the problem of dualism in the waters of the experiential features of the life-world and the subject. Recent findings in psychoneuroimmunology have shown that somato-psychic mechanisms exist through which bodily stimuli are translated into neuropsychological events resulting in alterations in certain behavioral patterns. These may as well include changes in the qualitative features of the lived body (Leib) resulting in an overall change in the subjective experience. The application of modern embodiment theories in life sciences has the potential to create a novel, fruitful and heuristic approach, which may help us unveil features of the “mind-body phenomenon” that have been hidden so far. In this paper, I will try to briefly outline a possible analytical framework on the grounds of classic - Husserlian and Merleau-Pontian - phenomenology and biomedical sciences.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Psychometric properties of the Hungarian Adult Attachment Scale]

ŐRI Dorottya, KAPORNAI Krisztina, BAJI Ildikó, KISS Enikő

[The revised Adult Attachment Scale (AAS) developed by N. L. Collins is a widely used questionnaire to measure adult attachment. However, its psychometric properties have not been investigated in Hungary. We aimed to confirm the key psychometric properties of the Hungarian version of the AAS focusing on reliability indices on a population that consis­ted of depressed and non-depressed young adults. The AAS is a self-report questionnaire, in which two different dimensional evaluating systems are possible: the original (close, depend, and anxiety) and the alternative scoring system (anxiety, avoidance). Our study population consisted of young adults with a history of major depression (n = 264, median age = 25.7 years) and their never-depressed biological siblings (n = 244, median age = 24.0). The internal consistency of close, anxiety, and avoidance scales were satisfactory (Cronbach-α >0.7). The consistency of the depend scale was slightly lower than expected (Cronbach-α = 0.62). Test-retest reliability was good for all of the scales, it ranged from 0.73 to 0.78 after 14 months of follow-up period. The scale showed good discrimination as tested by the differences of close and anxiety attachment dimensions between the groups (p<0.01). More­over, we were able to differentiate the currently dep­res­sed subjects based on these attachment dimensions. Explo­ra­tory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted, and a bifactor solution proved optimal model fit. The three dimensions of the AAS has not been confirmed. However, the close and anxiety scales of AAS were found to be adequate. Our results also indicate that attachment features correlate with major depressive episodes in adulthood.]