Clinical Neuroscience

[New methods in stroke intensive therapy: hemicraniectomy in patients with complete middle cerebral artery infarction and treatment of intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage with urokinase]

KAKUK Ilona, MAJOR Ottó, GUBUCZ István, NYÁRY István, NAGY Zoltán

APRIL 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(03-04)

[Life-threatening, complete middle cerebral artery infarction occurs in up to 10% of all stroke patients. The “malignant media occlusion” is an infarction occupying more than 50% of middle cerebral artery territory. The malignant, space-occupying supratentorial ischemic stroke is characterised by a mortality rate of up to 80%. Several reports indicate, that hemicraniectomy in this situation can be life-saving. Hemicraniectomy increases cerebral perfusion pressure and optimises retrograde perfusion via the leptomeningeal collateral vessels. A case of a patient is presented, having progressive neurological deterioration due to massive cerebral infarctions. The patient rehabilitation was successful. Decompressive surgery is life saving and can also give acceptable functional recovery. Hemorrhagic stroke is due to stroke in 15% of cases and in 10%, it is “spontaneous” intracerebral hematoma. The intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage represents one of the most devastating types of stroke associated with high morbidity and mortality. The 30-day mortality rate is 35% to 50% and most survivors are left with a neurological disability. The value of surgical therapy is debatable. The aspiration and urokinase therapy of the hematoma of intracerebral hemorrhage could improve final neurological outcome. Spontaneous, nontraumatic intraventricular hemorrhage frequently carries a grave prognosis. A large part of morbidity after intraventricular hemorrhage is related to intracranial hypertension from hydrocephalus. One patient presented had intracerebral hemorrhage and another had intraventricular hemorrhage treated with urokinase. Rapid and extensive reduction in the amount of intracerebral and intraventricular blood occurred. Urokinase lysis is safe and can be a potentially beneficial intervention in intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. By performing decompressive craniectomy, the neurologists of stroke departments and intensive care units with the neurosurgeons will have to play major role in the management of stroke patients.]

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[All patients having had stroke or TIA require special post-hospital care, being mainly the task of general pracititioners. The number of patients surviving stroke in Hungary is approximately 30 000/year. An important focus of care is secondary prevention: antithrombotic treatment and risk factors reduction. In case of residual signs of stroke, rehabilitation must also be organized and supported by the general practitioner. Medical conditions of cerebrovascular patients requiring special care demand are reviewed by the author. In this respect, some post-stroke conditions like dementia and depression require extra attention.]

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[MR investigations in stroke]

KENÉZ József, BARSI Péter

[In the article digital imaging methods are presented with special emphasis on the use on diagnostics of cerebral circulation studies. Recently, fundamental changes have happened in this field, concerning especially the MR investigations. These changes have influenced the therapeutic strategies of ischaemic stroke. Authors give the theoretical background on the diffusion and perfusion MR imaging, emphasising the importance of their “mismatch” and its impact in the estimation of the outcome of ischaemic events. More recently, new, controversial facts arose, regarding the reasons of the introduction of the theory of so called “negative” and “positive” mismatches. As a consequence, a level of uncertainty took place in the judgement of prognostics. The leading institutions are searching the way to solve the problem which seems to be the quantitative evaluation of the diffusion, perfusion and mismatch data. The advent of the multislice spiral CT with very fast imaging and the importance of CT investigations increased. With this new kind of equipment, even perfusion studies can be performed using iodinated contrast medium.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Regulatory mechanisms in focal cerebral ischemia. Perspectives in neuroprotective treatment]

NAGY Zoltán, SIMON László, BORI Zoltán

[Permanent or temporary disruption of cerebral blood flow rapidly depletes brain regions of their limited energy reserves (glycogen, glucose, oxygen, ATP) leading to an energy crisis. Tissue damage occurs due to the energy crisis. The central part of the damage, the ischaemic “core” region is surrounded by zones of the shell-like penumbra. Necrotic, as well as apoptotic cell death could be identified in the penumbra. Going away from the ischaemic core different neurochemical processes are occuring by space and time.“Immediate early response” genes (c-fos, fos-B, c-Jun, krox 20, 24) are activated, heatshock proteins (hsp 70, 72, HSF, HSE, HIF), cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β), inflammatory factors (COX), adhesion and glial factors (ICAM-1, ELAM-1, P-selectin), vasoactive factors (IL -6, -10, PAF), reactive oxigen radicals and connected factors (O2, OH, NO, NOS, SOD) are produced within minutes and hours. Cell deaths, necrosis and apoptosis due to the activation of calpains, caspases and nucleases occur in days. In parallel, growth factors and plasticity proteins (BDNF, NGF, TGF-β, VEGF, PDGF, GAP-43) are activated as a basis of functional rehabilitation.]

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[Purpose - Whereas the protective effect of mild-to-moderate alcohol consumption against ischemic stroke has been well recognized, there is conflicting evidence regarding the link between alcohol consumption and hemorrhagic strokes. The aim of the present study is to summarize the results of case-control and cohort studies published on this issue. Methods - Recent epidemiologic articles on the relationship between alcohol consumption and hemorrhagic stroke were identified by Medline searches limited to title words using the following search terms: ”alcohol AND cerebrovascular dis*”, ”alcohol AND stroke”, ”alcohol AND cerebral hemorrhage” and ”alcohol AND hemorrhagic stroke”. Results - Most case-control and cohort studies either repor-ted only on total strokes or on a combined group of hemorr-hagic strokes including intracerebral as well as subarachnoid hemorrhages. There was a consensus among reports that heavy alcohol consumption was associated with a higher risk of hemorrhagic strokes. Controversy remains regarding the effect of mild-to-moderate alcohol consumption: while some studies reported a protective effect, others found a dose-dependent linear relationship between the amount of alcohol consumed and the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The differential effect of moderate alcohol consumption on hemorrhagic compared to ischemic strokes is mostly attributed to alcohol- and withdrawal- induced sudden elevations of blood pressure, and coagulation disorders. Conclusions - Heavy drinking should be considered as one of the risk factors for hemorrhagic stroke. In contrast to the protective effect of mild-to-moderate alcohol use against ischemic strokes, moderate drinking might result in an increased risk of hemorrhagic strokes.]

Clinical Neuroscience

The evaluation of the relationship between risk factors and prognosis in intracerebral hemorrhage patients

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Objective - Patients were assessed in terms of risk factors, hematoma size and localization, the effects of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) on mortality and morbidity, and post-stroke depression. Materials and methods - The present study evaluated the demographic data, risk factors, and neurological examinations of 216 ICH patients. The diagnosis, volume, localization, and ventricular extension of the hematomas were determined using computed tomography scans. The mortality rate through the first 30 days was evaluated using ICH score and ICH grading scale. The Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) was used to determine the dependency status and functional recovery of each patient, and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was administered to assess the psychosocial status of each patient. Results - The mean age of the patients was 65.3±14.5 years. The most common locations of the ICH lesions were as follows: lobar (28.3%), thalamus (26.4%), basal ganglia (24.0%), cerebellum (13.9%), and brainstem (7.4%). The average hematoma volume was 15.8±23.8 cm3; a ventricular extension of the hemorrhage developed in 34.4% of the patients, a midline shift in 28.7%, and perihematomal edema, as the most frequently occurring complication, in 27.8%. Over the 6-month follow-up period, 57.9% of patients showed a poor prognosis (mRS: ≥3), while 42.1% showed a good prognosis (mRS: <3). The mortality rate over the first 30 days was significantly higher in patients with a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at admission, a large hematoma volume, and ventricular extension of the hemorrhage (p=0.0001). In the poor prognosis group, the presence of moderate depression (39.13%) was significantly higher than in the good prognosis group (p=0.0001). Conclusion - Determination and evaluation of the factors that could influence the prognosis and mortality of patients with ICH is crucial for the achievement of more effective patient management and improved quality of life.

Clinical Neuroscience

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