Clinical Neuroscience

[Neuron to glia - 15 years history of the cytoplasmic]

PAPP Mátyás

MARCH 24, 2010

Clinical Neuroscience - 2010;63(03-04)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Comment of the invited editor]

FOLYOVICH András

Clinical Neuroscience

[Differential diagnosis of atypical Parkinsonian syndromes]

CSÓTI Ilona, FORNÁDI Ferenc

[Atypical Parkinson syndromes are distinguished from idiopathic Parkinson disease by insufficient or missing response to dopaminergic replacement therapy and therefore they have significantly unfavorable prognoses. Early differential diagnosis is very important for the patient. It enables the therapist to give suitable consults, to avoid unnecessary or inappropriate therapy, which are not free of medication side effects and furthermore facilitates the selection of adapted symptomatically medical and physical measures of treatment. In case of future development of neuroprotective or causally therapy strategies correct diagnosis will allow an early start of therapy. The differential diagnosis separation of the three clinical pictures from the idiopathic Parkinson disease with clinical criteria might be difficult in the early stage of disease. Additional neuroimaging and nuclear medical investigations may support the clinical probable diagnosis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal lobar degeneration - Overview of a group of proteinopathies]

CATHERINE Haberland

[Frontotemporal dementia is the second most common early onset dementia after Alzheimer disease. Frontotemporal dementias are a complex group of dementias. The clinical diagnosis can be perplexing because of concurring psychiatric and neurologic syndromes. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration, the underlying pathology, represents an emerging group of proteinopathies. Genetic factors play an important part in the etiologies of dementias. This article overviews current defining characteristics of frontotemporal dementias known also as frontotemporal lobar degenerations]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Numbers, counting and calculating problems in view of cognitive neurology]

MÁRKUS Attila

[The ability to count and calculate is a human-specific skill comprised of understanding numeric values and categories and performing numerical operations; it is an acoustic-verbal symbolic activity that may be expressed in writing and understood by reading. The neuronal bases and precursors of cognitive systems have been supplied to mankind by the process of evolution. Abilities to create symbols (speech, visual letter and number symbols) must have played a decisive role in the emergence of man from the world of primates. Although counting and calculating problems are classified into numerous types, two main forms of dyscalculia have practical importance: the acquired one (the loss of learned knowledge) and the developmental one (the disturbance of the acquisition of arythmetical knowledge).]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Vertigo - comorbidity with psychiatric disorders]

FAZEKAS András

[Vertigo is one of the most common symptom and complaint in the clinical practice. The differential diagnosis can only be attained by a careful interdisciplinary way of thinking and activity, given the fact that the vestibular, neurological and psychiatric disorders - considered as pathogenic factors - are being present simultaneously in triggering the symptoms, and there can be overlaps between the certain pathological processes. The author deals with the co-morbidity of the vertigo and the psychiatric symptoms - anxiety, panic-disorder -, pointing out the common neurobiological and neurophysiological factors in the background of the symptoms, emphasizing the importance of the SSRI-s in the restoration of the serotonerg dysfunction.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

VASTAGH Ildikó, SZŐCS Ildikó, OBERFRANK Ferenc, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Focus on Lege Artis Medicinae (LAM)]

VASAS Lívia, GEGES József

[Three decades ago, LAM was launched with the goal of providing scientific information about medicine and its frontiers. From the very beginning, LAM has also concerned a special subject area while connecting medicine with the world of art. In the palette of medical articles, it remained a special feature to this day. The analysis of the history of LAM to date was performed using internationally accepted publication guidelines and scientific databases as a pledge of objectivity. We examined the practice of LAM if it meets the main criteria, the professional expectations of our days, when publishing contents of the traditional printed edition and its electronic version. We explored the visibility of articles in the largest bibliographic and scientific metric databases, and reviewed the LAM's place among the Hun­ga­rian professional journals. Our results show that in recent years LAM has gained international reputation des­pite publishing in Hungarian spoken by a few people. This is due to articles with foreign co-authors as well as references to LAM in articles written exclusively by foreign researchers. The journal is of course full readable in the Hungarian bibliographic databases, and its popularity is among the leading ones. The great virtue of the journal is the wide spectrum of the authors' affiliation, with which they cover almost completely the Hungarian health care institutional sys­tem. The special feature of its columns is enhanced by the publication of writings on art, which may increase Hungarian and foreign interest like that of medical articles.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The LAM’s 30 years]

FARSANG Csaba

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.