Clinical Neuroscience

Neurinoma of the abducens nerve

KUNCZ Ádám1, BORDA Lóránt1

MAY 20, 1994

Clinical Neuroscience - 1994;47(05-06)

Abducens nerve neurinomas are very uncommon. There have been only 5 cases published in the literature up till now. We present another case of abducens nerve neurinoma.

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery

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