Clinical Neuroscience

[MR examination of thoracic herniation of the spinal cord]

KENÉZ József, BARSI Péter, VÁRALLYAY György, BOBEST Mátyás, VERES Róbert

JUNE 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(05-06)

[Transdural herniation of the spinal cord is thought to be previously extremely rare and very often misdiagnosed. Possible reasons may be iatrogenic and traumatic or in about one third of cases it may be unknown, where the probable origin might be a congenital dural defect. The pathology may show characteristic and misleading MR patterns of the thoracic spine, emphasising the importance of these patterns. This anomaly can lead to progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. Surgical intervention, consisting the repair of the dural defect may result in improvement or even complete regression of the neurologic deficits.]

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[Introduction - This is the first Hungarian paper on the insertion/deletion polymorphism of ACE gene in stroke patients. According to literature data, the role of this polymorphism is controversial in the pathogenesis of stroke. The aim was to study the prevalence of the polymorphism in healthy persons and in stroke patients. Patients and methods - Blood samples from 173 unrelated healthy donors and 253 stroke patients were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Preivous stroke was documented by CT or MRI and CDS. A routine questionnaire was used to study previous vascular events and the risk profile of patients. Results - I/I allele was found in 20%, I/D 52% and D/D 28% in the healthy group. Prevalence of the pathologic D/D allele did not differ between healthy and patients group (28% and 27%, OR: 0.88, and in subgroup age under 50 years OR: 1.00). No correlation was found between D/D and conventional risk profile but a positiv correlation was found in young patients having D/D and hyperlipidemia (p<0.05) and hyperfibrinogenemia (p<0.05). D/D prevalence was found higher in patients with family anamnesis of myocardial infarction (p<0.05). Very low prevalence of D/D allele was found in cardiogen embolic group (p>0.05). Conclusions - The ACE polymorphism does not seem to be an independent risk factor for stroke. However, in young stroke patients with D/D allele, hyperlipidemia and/or hyperfibrinogenemia present very high risk for stroke.]

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