Clinical Neuroscience

[MORTALITY OF HOSPITALIZED STROKE PATIENTS IN HUNGARY; 2003-2005]

GULÁCSI László, MÁJER István, KÁRPÁTI Krisztián, BRODSZKY Valentin, BONCZ Imre, NAGY Attila, BERECZKI Dániel

JULY 30, 2007

Clinical Neuroscience - 2007;60(07-08)

[The aim of our research was to assess the incidence and the 12- and 24-month mortality of hospitalized stroke in Hungary. We analyzed the rate of mortality after stroke and compared it to the standard mortality rate of the population. To assess the incidence we extracted the data of “new” stroke patients (ICD- 10 diagnoses: I60-64) hospitalized in May 2003 from the database of the National Health Insurance Fund Administration. We regarded those as “new” patients who had not been treated with these primary or secondary diagnoses in the previous 24 months. Data were collected by sex and age (age groups: 25-44, 45-64, 65 and over). We analyzed the patients' survival on the basis of their April 2004 and April 2005 data. The incidence of the “new” hospitalized stroke patients was higher in men than in women; the incidence in the age group of 65 and over was 2112/100.000 in males and 1582/100.000 in females, the corresponding values in the 45-64 age group were 623 vs. 366 per 100.000, respectively. In 2003 more than 42 thousand “new” stroke patients were hospitalized in Hungary of whom over 10 thousand died in the first year, followed by a further 2 thousand in the second year. Women’s survival is more favourable than men's: in the first year it is 71.47% vs. 69.24% (65+ group), and 88.18% vs. 83.16% (45-64 group); in the second year the corresponding values are 66.95% vs. 61.62% (65+), and 85.45% vs. 80.90% (45-64), respectively. The risk of death in the first year after stroke, compared to the standard population, is 5.17- fold in women and 4.70-fold in men in the total sample, and 10-15-fold in the 45-64 group. There are large differences by gender, particularly in men of the working age groups (25-44, 45-64), whose mortality is twice as high as that of women of the same age.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[DYT1 POSITIVE GENERALISED DYSTONIA: A CASE STUDY OF TWO SIBLINGS]

BEREZNAI Benjámin, BARACZKA Krisztina, NAGY Zoltán, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[The early-onset generalised dystonia is a dyskinetic movement disorder with a wide variety in phenotype and poor response to pharmacological treatment. A mutation on the DYT1 gene is responsible for the disease in more than 50% of cases with typical early-onset dystonia beginning in a limb. We describe the medical history of two brothers with first signs of focal dystonia at age 12 starting with right side lower limb dystonia of the older brother and writers cramp of the younger one. In both over a period of 6 and 10 years dystonia generalised. The negativ results of MRI, electrophisiological testing and muscle biopsy corroborate the diagnosis of primary dystonia. The DNA from the older patient was tested for the 3 bp deletion in exon 5 of the DYT1 gene by restriction enzyme. The positive result confirmed the diagnosis of early-onset primary dystonia. A short synopsis of routine molecular genetic tests indications and treatment options is outlined.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[In memoriam István Somogyi MD]

SZILÁRD János, JÁRDÁNHÁZY Tamás

Clinical Neuroscience

[SOCIAL INSURANCE COSTS OF STROKE HOSPITAL TREATMENTS IN HUNGARY; 2003-2005]

KÁRPÁTI Krisztián, MÁJER István, BONCZ Imre, NAGY Attila, BERECZKI Dániel, GULÁCSI László

[Our aim was to assess the social insurance costs of hospital treatments for acute stroke in Hungary between 2003 and 2005. We studied how much burden stroke patients impose on the financer (National Health Insurance Fund Administration) in acute and chronic hospital admissions. We extracted the data of “new” stroke patients (ICD-10: I60-64 diagnosis) hospitalized in May 2003 from the database of the financer. We analyzed active and chronic hospital treatment costs of these patients in the period of 12 months before the stroke and in the following first and second 12 months. Data were collected by sex and age (age groups: 25-44, 45-64, over 65). We studied patients hospitalized in May 2003 with the ICD-10: I60-64 main diagnosis but not being treated with the same diagnosis in the previous 24 months. In the first 12 months of the active care the burden of the disease was (male vs. female) 65+: 254.6 vs. 205.8; 45-64: 341.4 vs. 280.5; 25-44: 370.1 vs. 306.1 thousand HUF per patient. In the second 12 months the costs were 50.6 vs. 36.2; 24.2 vs. 32.6; 27.6 vs. 24.8 thousand HUF respectively. In the first year following the episode the costs of the chronic hospital treatment were (age groups as above) 23.3 vs. 31.3; 28.9 vs. 22.2; 22.8 vs. 22.5 thousand HUF. A year later the chronic hospital costs were 9.0 vs. 10.9; 6.7 vs. 12.2; 1.4 vs. 38.1 thousand HUF respectively. Average costs of stroke are higher in the case of males as are in the case of females, 364.8 vs. 303.0 thousand HUF in the first 24 months. The remarkable difference results from active hospital treatment costs (331.5 vs. 262.1 thousand HUF), while the discrepancy is smaller in the chronic hospital care (33.3 vs. 40.9 thousand HUF).]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

[Congress calendar 2007;60(07-08)]

Clinical Neuroscience

[A CASE OF FRONTOTEMPORAL LOBAR DEGENERATION WITH UBIQUITIN-POSITIVE INTRANEURONAL INCLUSIONS]

LEEL-ŐSSY Lóránt, RÉVÉSZ Tamás, ALMÁSI Kálmán, SZŰCS Iván, SZABÓ Éva

[The case of a 57 year-old-man is reported who has been treated several times because of his relatively expedite mental decline which has begun four years before his death. His first complaints were forgetfulness, mild changes in his behaviour, confusion and difficulty in speech. The neuropsychiatric examinations displayed a mild difficulty in naming and sometimes comprehension of words, although his speech was gramatically correct. Furthermore the patient presented a very severe decrease in short term memory with dementia and confusion. These symptomes together with the results of CT and test examinations established the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Finally pneumonia afflicted the patient during the last hospitalization and he died. Histopathological examinations of the brain showed a severe, mainly temporofrontal atrophy caused by an extensive cortical neuronal loss and gliosis without neurofibrillar degenerations and senile plaques which characterize the Alzheimer's disease. Tau-positivity Pick- and Lewy-bodies may not be found. The loss of neurons associated in some places with spongiosity of laminar form. The ubiquitine-positive intracytoplasmic inclusions proved to be the most characteristic feature in the swollen neurons. These mainly occurred in the gray matter of the mediobasal part of the temporal lobe. The positivity of GFAP immunocytochemistry revealed a definite astrocytosis in the affected parts of the gray matter. In the temporal and frontal cortex scattered ballooned cells (achromatic or Pick cells) were seen in αB-crystallin immunohistochemistry. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of the case of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive intraneuronal inclusions (FTLD-U) without tau-positivity. The separation of the different forms in the group of the frontotemporal dementias is recommended by means of the modern immunocytochemical examinations.]

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