Clinical Neuroscience

[LORETA (Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography): A three-dimensional EEG source localization method]

CLEMENS Béla

SEPTEMBER 23, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(09-10)

[The author presents a brief overview of the EEG source localization method LORETA (Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography) with special reference to the not widely discussed data.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Functional magnetic resonance imaging for cortical mapping in epilepsy]

KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf, TÓTH Vivien, BARSI Péter, RUDAS Gábor

[It is not only the total curative resection of pathological tissue or the minimization of symptoms to be considered in epilepsy surgery or other neurosurgical procedures, it is equally desirable to maintain the best possible quality of life. Cortical mapping methods can help achieve this goal by delineating eloquent areas, i.e. brain regions that are vital for providing an acceptable quality of life, albeit not prone to compensatory reorganization. These areas include among others the Broca and Wernicke regions for speech, the primary motor, sensory and visual cortices. Functional MRI gained importance in the last decade as a non-invasive clinical cortical mapping technique. This method is capable of localizing cortical areas selectively activated by a given task condition. Thus, selecting appropriate tasks can help mapping eloquent brain regions. Using functional MRI provides information that is complementary to other mapping methods. Moreover, it can replace invasive methods such as the Wada test. Here, we explain the background of functional MRI, compare it to other clinical mapping methods, explain the intricacies of paradigm selection, and show the limitations of the technique while also pointing out alternative uses.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Magnetic resonance measuring and analitic methods in epilepsy]

BARSI Péter

[Neuroradiology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as its leading tool play a basic role in the diagnostics of epilepsy. The result of the MRI examination is of utmost importance in patients with therapy resistent focal epilepsy possibly requiring neurosurgical intervention. Based on the continuously developing MRI techniques, we can use an optimal imaging protocol. Cerebral structures can be evaluated on a microanatomical level on high-resolution images with thin slices. The three-dimensional (3D) sequence has high spatial resolution, properly distinguishes cerebral grey and white matter, provides the possibility of surface rendering and volumetry, as well as an anatomical basis for other methods like tractography, functional MRI and neuronavigation. Diffusion weighted and diffusion tensor imaging (DWI, DTI) and tractography has an important role in differential diagnostics and tractography visualizes the main white matter tracts and their relation with brain pathologies. MR perfusion (MRP) provides help in differential diagnostics and may have a future role in the determination of the epileptogenic focus in multifocal pathologies. MR spectroscopy (MRS) is important in differential diagnostics, lateralization of focal epilepsy and in the confirmation of hippocampal sclerosis. Several of these methods need special hardware, software and expertise, but the basic MRI protocol for epilepsy can be implemented in all modern MR scanners of middle or high field strength.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The methodology and objectives of registrating high frequency oscillation in epilepsy]

CLEMENS Zsófia

[Technological advances in digital EEG allowed the recording the full frequency band of the EEG. Activity beyond the traditional 0.3-70 Hz band reflects both physiological and pathological processes. High frequency activity recorded from the epileptic brain has been related to both epileptogenicity and epileptogenesis. The article reviews research avenues, clinical applications, and the methodology of detecting and quantifying high frequency activity.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Prolonged EEG-monitoring]

HALÁSZ Péter

[Prolonged EEG monitoring and video-EEG monitoring are basic methods on the level of epilepsy centers. These methods are able to make differences between epilepsy and non epileptic paroxysmal manifestations like psychogenic non epileptic seizures, parasomniac phenomena, narcolepsy. The application of the method, at least the video-EEG variant, needs team work, high level organisation, highly educated staff and high tech electrographic devices. Running the method even with these requirements is beneficial from the cost-benefit aspect as well.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Role of deep brain stimulation in epilepsy]

JANSZKY József, BALÁS István, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging treatment option in brain disorders in which randomized multicenter trials proved its efficacy leading to licensing different DBS methods in various brain diseases. More recently more and more brain structures have become candidates for being “target” in a possible DBS treatment of epilepsy. At present, only the DBS of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus (ANT) can be considered as a proved method for epilepsy treatment. Other potential targets for DBS treatment in epilepsy are the subthalamic nuclei, and the amygdala- hippocampus complex. There are some ongoing randomized studies to investigating their therapeutical role. The therapeutical outcome of ANT-DBS treatment in drug-resistant epilepsy seems to be better than the new antiepileptic drugs, but much worse than the results of a potential epilepsy surgery. At about 10% of patients may become seizure-free and 50% of patients may have a significant improvement. Nowadays ANT-DBS should be considered as an “ultima ratio” in those adult drug-resistant epilepsy patients with normal intelligence in which neither new antiepileptic drugs nor resective epilepsy surgery are a reasonable therapeutical options.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

The yield of electroencephalography in syncope

NALBANTOGLU Mecbure, TAN Ozturk Ozlem

Introduction - Syncope is defined as a brief transient loss of consciousness due to cerebral hypoperfusion. Although the diagnosis of syncope is based on a thorough history and examination, electroencaphalography (EEG) is also an important investigational tool in the differential diagnosis in this group of patients. In this study we aimed to identify the diagnostic value of EEG in patients with syncope. Methods - We retrospectively examined EEG recordings of 288 patients with the diagnosis of syncope referred to the Cankiri State Hospital EEG laboratory, from January 2014 to January 2016. The EEG findings were classified into 6 groups as normal, epileptiform discharges (spike and sharp waves), generalized background slowing, focal slowing, hemispherical asymmetries, and low amplitude EEG tracing. The EEGs were separated according to gender and age. Results - Total of 288 patients were included in this study, 148 were females (51.4%) and 140 (48.6%) were males. Among all the EEG reports, 203 (70.5%) were normal, 8 of them (2.8%) showed generalized background slowing and 7 (2.4%) demonstrated focal slow waves. Epileptiform discharges occured among 13 patients (4.5%). Hemispherical asymmetries were detected in 10 patients (3.5%) and low amplitude EEG tracing in 47 patients (16.3%). There was no significant difference between age groups in EEG findings (p=0.3). Also no significant difference was detected in EEG results by gender (p=0.2). Discussion - Although the diagnosis of syncope, epilepsy and non-epileptic seizures is clinical diagnosis, EEG still remains additional method

Clinical Neuroscience

[Diagnosis of epilepsy]

JANSZKY József

[0.5-1% of the population suffers from epilepsy, while another 5% undergoes diagnostic evaluations due to the possibility of epilepsy. In the case of suspected epileptic seizures we face the following questions: Is it an epileptic seizure? The main and most frequent differential- diagnostic problems are the psychogenic non-epileptic seizures ("pseudo-seizures") and the convulsive syncope, which is often caused by heart disorders. Is it epilepsy? After an unprovoked seizure, the information on recurrence risk is an important question. The reoccurrence is more possible if a known etiological factor is present or the EEG shows epileptiform discharges. After an isolated epileptic seizure, the EEG is specific to epilepsy in 30-50% of cases. The EEG should take place within 24 hours postictally. If the EEG shows no epileptiform potentials, a sleep-EEG is required. What is the cause of seizures? Hippocampal sclerosis, benign tumors, and malformations of the cortical development are the most frequent causes of the focal epilepsy. Three potentially life-threatening conditions may cause chronic epilepsy: vascular malformations, tumors, and neuroinfections. The diagnosis in theses cases can usually be achieved by MRI, therefore, MRI is obligatory in all epilepsies starting in adulthood. The presence of epileptogenic lesion has a prognostic significance in treatment. If the MRI shows a circumscribed lesion then the pharmacological treatment will likely to be unsuccessful, while surgery may result in seizure freedom. The new and quantitative MRI techniques, such as volumetry, T2-relaxometry, MR-spectroscopy, and functional MRI play a growing role in the epilepsy diagnosis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Spectral, phase-synchronization, and graph theoretical EEG changes related to mental arithmetics]

BOHA Roland, TÓTH Brigitta, GAÁL Zsófia Anna, KARDOS Zsófia, FILE Bálint, MOLNÁR Márk

[During mental arithmetic operations working memory playsan important role, but there are only few studies in which anattempt was made to separate this effect from the process ofarithmetics per se. In this study the effects of arithmetic onthe EEG of young adults (14 participants, six of themwomen, mean age 21.57 years, SD: 2.62) was investigatedduring a subtraction task in the θ(4-8 Hz) frequency band.Besides the power density spectrum analysis phasesynchrony based on recently developed graph theoreticalmethods were used and strength of local connections (clustercoefficient; C) and global interconnectedness of network(characteristic path length; L) were determined. Before thearithmetic task passive viewing (control situation) and anumber recognition paradigms were used. During the arith-metic task compared to the control situation significantlyincreasing phase synchrony and C values were found. L wassignificantly shorter (F(2, 26)=818.77, p<0.0001) only dur-ing the arithmetic task: this fact and the former two resultsimply that the network topology shifted towards the “smallworld” direction. Our findings concerning regionaldifferences confirm those reported earlier in the literature:compared to the control condition significant task-relatedincrease was found in C values in the parietal areas [moreexplicitly in the left side, (F(1, 13)=7.2020, p=0.0188)],which probably corresponds to stronger local connectionsand more synchronized (sub)networks. During the task con-dition significantly increased θband power; (F(1,13)=7.9708, p=0.0144) and decreased L values werefound in the left frontal region compared to the right side(F(1, 13)=6.0734, p=0.0284), which can also be interpret-ed as an indicator of optimized network topology ofinformation processing.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[EEG-based cerebral networks in 14 neurological disorders]

DÖMÖTÖR Johanna, CLEMENS Béla, CSÉPÁNY Tünde, EMRI Miklós, FOGARASI András, HOLLÓDY Katalin, PUSKÁS Szilvia, FEKETE Klára, KOVÁCS Attila, FEKETE István

[Background - Brain networks have not been systematically investigated yet in most neurological disorders. Purpose - To investigate EEG functional connectivity (EEGfC) networks in 14 neurological disorders. Patients - Potentially eligible patients were collected from clinical and EEG databases. All the available clinical data and EEG records were critically revised. All the patients who suffered of a single neurological disorder (out of the 14) and had a good quality EEG recording entered the study. Confoundig factors as comorbidity and CNS-active drug effects were eliminated as far as possible. EEG analysis - Three minutes of resting-state, waking EEG activity were selected for analysis. Current source density (CSD) values were computed for 2394 cortical voxels by Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA). Thereafter, Pearson correlation coefficients were computed between all pairs of 23 cortical regions of interest (ROI) in each hemisphere (LORETA Source Correlation, LSC software). Computation was carried out for conventional EEG broad bands and very narrow bands (1 Hz bandwidth) between 1 and 25 Hz as well. Correlation coefficients of each group were statistically compared to our normative EEG (LSC) database by two-talied t-tests. Bonferroni-corrected p<0.05 values were accepted as statistically significant, and were graphically displayed as topographical networks. Results and conclusion - Group-specific networks were demonstrated. However, non-specific networks, charasteristic for most groups, were detected as well. Common finding were: decreased connectivity in the alpha band and increased connectivity in the delta, theta bands and upper-beta band. Decreased alpha-band connectivity presumably reflected primary lesional effects and on the other hand, non-specific vulnerability of “rich club connections”. Increased connectivity in the slow bands presumably indicated adaptive-compensatory activity of brain homeostasis. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[EEG source localization using LORETA (Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography)]

PUSKÁS Szilvia

[Electroencephalography (EEG) has excellent temporal resolution, but the spatial resolution is poor. Different source localization methods exist to solve the so-called inverse problem, thus increasing the accuracy of spatial localization. This paper provides an overview of the history of source localization and the main categories of techniques are discussed. LORETA (Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography) is introduced in details: technical informations are discussed and localization properties of LORETA method are compared to other inverse solutions. Validation of the method with different imaging techniques is also discussed. This paper reviews several publications using LORETA both in healthy persons and persons with different neurological and psychiatric diseases. Finally future possible applications are discussed.]