Clinical Neuroscience

[In memoriam Zoltán Várhegyi (1939. 01. 03-2012. 08. 10.)]

TÖRÖK Pál

OCTOBER 05, 2013

Clinical Neuroscience - 2013;66(09-10)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Characterization of CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs in a Hodgkin’s lymphoma patient presenting with myasthenia-like symptoms]

KRAUSZ Ludovic Tibor, MAJOR Zoltán Zsigmond, MURESANU Dafin Fior, CHELARU Eugen, NOCENTINI Giuseppe, RICCARDI Carlo

[The co-occurrence of Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) and myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare phenomenon that is sometimes considered a paraneoplastic manifestation. There are a few documented cases in which myasthenia symptoms manifested only after the surgical removal of the tumor. However, the biological basis of this association is unknown. One hypothesis is that it derives from the infiltration of the residual thymic tissue by the developing tumor. In our case, the myasthenic symptoms led to the HL diagnosis. Our objective was to investigate the T cell phenotype in a HL patient presenting myasthenia-like symptoms. In patients with autoimmune disease, Tregs are usually decreased, but in some diseases, they appear to be increased. It has been speculated that this phenomenon may occur due to a homeostatic attempt by the immune system to control the expansion of auto-reactive effector cells. In the described patient the proportion of lymphoma infiltrating Tregs was high (more than 10% of CD4+ and 1.34% of CD8+ cells), suggesting that Tregs are increased in patients suffering from HL and eventually of myasthenia gravis. Treg involvement in HL is controversial and is currently under investigation. In this context, our data may contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanism of the link between HL and autoimmune phenomena.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The impact of the vitamin D in neurological diseases and neurorehabilitation: from demencia to multiple sclerosis. Part I: The role of the vitamin D in the prevetion and treatment of multiple sclerosis]

SPEER Gábor

[The world-wide incidence of vitamin D deficiency is high, independently of age. Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disorder, occuring in those who possess or are exposed to a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. One of the environmental factors associated with the development is vitamin D. Vitamin D is an immunomodulatory agent, its role is verified in many of autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D inhibits IL-6, IL-17 and IL-23 secretions which are crucial in Th1 and Th17 differentiation and also decreases proinflammatorical cytokine production. Moreover it enhances the immunosuppressive IL-10 cytokine secretion and inhibits the T-reg cell development. These cytokines and cells are essential for the pathomechanism of multiple sclerosis. Data have shown, that the vitamin D levels above 100 nmol/l (40 ng/ml) is essential for the prevention of multiple sclerosis. Below this level the vitamin D supplementation is reasonable. In pregnancy, the vitamin D deficiency at the last two semester increases the risk for the multiple sclerosis of the infant. The optimal vitamin D level for multiple sclerosis patients is 100-150 nmol/l (40-60 ng/ml). There is no consensus for the role of vitamin D in multiple sclerosis yet, but until the achieving this, the diagnosis and the treatment of the vitamin D deficiency is crucial for scelrosis multiplex patients and in cases of elevated risk. Data shows, that in patient with multiple sclerosis the normal vitamin D level is suboptimal, however the exact role of vitamin D and doses must be clarified by interventional studies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Comment]

SZŰCS Anna, MAROSFŐI Miklós, VÁRALLYAY Péter, KAMONDI Anita

Clinical Neuroscience

[Occurence and molecular pathology of high grade gliomas]

MURNYÁK Balázs, CSONKA Tamás, HEGYI Katalin, MÉHES Gábor, KLEKNER Álmos, HORTOBÁGYI Tibor

[Background - Glial tumours represent the most frequent type of primary brain cancers. Gliomas are characterized by heterogeneity that makes the diagnosis, histological classification and the choosing of correct therapy more difficult. Despite the advances in developing therapeutic strategies patients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis; therefore glial tumours represent one of the most important areas of cancer research. There are no detailed data on the epidemiology of gliomas in Hungary. Methods - In the first section of our publication, we analysed the histological diagnosed cases between 2007 and 2011 at the Institute of Pathology, University of Debrecen Medical and Health Science Centre. We analyzed the incidence of 214 high-grade gliomas by tumor grades, gender, age, and the anatomical localization. Results - The majority of cases were glioblastoma (182 cases), and the remaining 32 cases were anaplastic gliomas. The mean age of patients was 57 years (±16.4), and the male:female ratio was 1.1:1. The most frequent area of tumors was the frontal lobe followed by the temporal, parietal and occipital lobe. We include new findings published recently about glioma patogenesis, molecular pathways, mutant genes and chromosomal regions. We explain briefly the role of selected important genes in glioma genesis and give an update on knowledge provided by modern molecular methods, which could beneficially influence future therapy and the diagnosis of gliomas.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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