Clinical Neuroscience

[Hungarian Spine Association]

PENTELÉNYI Tamás

JULY 20, 1993

Clinical Neuroscience - 1993;46(07-08)

[Further scientific programme of the Hungarian Spine Society in 1993.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Pathology of the vestibular system

GOSZTONYI György, ZILL Edith

The vestibular end organ, in spite of its small size, has extremely rich interconnections with other parts of the nervous system. The vestibular system can be damaged at the end organ, along the vestibular nerve, in its brain stem representations and in its cerebellar projections. The nature of the pathological process damaging the vestibular system is manifold: neoplastic, inflammatory, vascular, nutritional and degenerative. Neural complications of AIDS may also involve the vestibular system. The lesions may be focal, multifocal and diffuse. While in the past the results of neurootological examinations could only be correlated with post mortem findings, NMI opens new horizons for neurootological and topoanatomical correlative studies.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Vascular surgery in the prevention of stroke]

MOGÁN István, NEMES Atilla, NAGY Zoltán

[In Hungary the prevalence of cerebrovascular disorders has increased so that each year vascular reconstruction surgery is needed in 2800 cases. However, only a quarter of these eligible patients are operated. After a thorough examination if all the indications for carotid surgery are met, more and more patients will end up in vascular reconstruction units. Angiography and surgery are recommended if the carotid artery stenosis is asymptomatic and is more than 90%. Also, under special conditions an asymptomatic carotid stenosis may caused by indicate surgery (before coronary by-pass operation, etc.). Another indication is a transient ischemic attack, if carotid artery lesion and the stenosis is above 70%. Ulcerated plaques also need surgery because they are a likely source of emboli. After stroke surgery may be necessary if the angiologic status is unstable and further ischemic events, that may lead to disability are expected. An acute stroke rarely calls for surgery. In contrast to this, immediate surgery is needed after repeated, TIA, or crescendo TIA because the risk of stroke is very high in these cases. Finally, sometimes surgery is indicated because of the occlusion of internal and common carotid artery. With vertebrobasilar vascular reconstruction, we do not have enough experience. Cerebrovascular syndromes due to supraaortic vascular lesions are other indications for reconstruction surgery. However, surgery is never a satisfactory substitute for pharmacological treatment.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Transcranial doppler detection of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage]

BARZÓ Pál, BORDA Lóránt, VÖRÖS Erika, KISS Mariann, BODOSI Mihály, DÓCZI Tamás

[In 22 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured intracranial aneurysms serial neurological evaluations, transcranial Doppler examinations and computer tomographic scans were performed. Transcranial Doppler flow velocities were significantly elevated for the group with vasospasm on posthemorrhage day 2. The maximum blood flow velocities were recorded between days 9 and 18, with normalization occurring within the following 3 weeks. Increase in velocity preceded clinical symptoms and could therefore be used as a prognostic factor for the management of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. The data also indicated that the extent and location of blood in the subarachnoid space determine the severity and location of vasospasm.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Spinal lipomas and their surgery]

PARAVICZ Ervin, TÓTH Katalin, TORMA Albert

[18 intraspinal lipomas were operated, mostly in childhood. Surgery seems to be indicated unavoidably in view of preoperative clinical progression and postoperative improvement. Prior MR investigation was indispensable to the surgical procedure.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Elective extra-intracranial arterial bypass in the treatment of giant aneurysms of the carotid artery]

BODOSI Mihály, DÓCZI Tamás, BARZÓ Pál

[Clinical details are presented of 5 patients with a giant carotid aneurysm in whom both the occlusion of the aneurysm and the parent internal carotid artery were performed with an extra-intracranial arterial bypass. In the first case ligature of the giant carotid-ophthalmic aneurysm narrowed the parent artery critically and hemiplegia developed. The bypass operation did not improve the clinical outcome. In the second case the occlusion of the aneurysm was performed after an extra-intracranial anastomosis and in spite of the severely narrowed carotid artery the postoperative course was uneventful. In three cases of giant intracavernous aneurysm the occlusion of the carotid artery on the neck and just proximal to the ophthalmic artery was performed in the presence of an arterial bypass. All of the anastomoses were patent and no ischemic event developed during the follow up period. On the basis of these experiences the authors suggest that, if the preoperative tests (TCD, EEG, SPECT) reveal impending ischemic lesion after carotid compression, surgery should be performed with the combination of extra-intracranial bypass.]

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Fluoxetine use is associated with improved survival of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia: A retrospective case-control study

NÉMETH Klára Zsófia, SZÛCS Anna , VITRAI József , JUHÁSZ Dóra , NÉMETH Pál János , HOLLÓ András

We aimed to investigate the association between fluoxetine use and the survival of hospitalised coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia patients. This retrospective case-control study used data extracted from the medical records of adult patients hospitalised with moderate or severe COVID-19 pneumonia at the Uzsoki Teaching Hospital of the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary between 17 March and 22 April 2021. As a part of standard medical treatment, patients received anti-COVID-19 therapies as favipiravir, remdesivir, baricitinib or a combination of these drugs; and 110 of them received 20 mg fluoxetine capsules once daily as an adjuvant medication. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between fluoxetine use and mortality. For excluding a fluoxetine-selection bias potentially influencing our results, we compared baseline prognostic markers in the two groups treated versus not treated with fluoxetine. Out of the 269 participants, 205 (76.2%) survived and 64 (23.8%) died between days 2 and 28 after hospitalisation. Greater age (OR [95% CI] 1.08 [1.05–1.11], p<0.001), radiographic severity based on chest X-ray (OR [95% CI] 2.03 [1.27–3.25], p=0.003) and higher score of shortened National Early Warning Score (sNEWS) (OR [95% CI] 1.20 [1.01-1.43], p=0.04) were associated with higher mortality. Fluoxetine use was associated with an important (70%) decrease of mortality (OR [95% CI] 0.33 [0.16–0.68], p=0.002) compared to the non-fluoxetine group. Age, gender, LDH, CRP, and D-dimer levels, sNEWS, Chest X-ray score did not show statistical difference between the fluoxetine and non-fluoxetine groups supporting the reliability of our finding. Provisional to confirmation in randomised controlled studies, fluoxetine may be a potent treatment increasing the survival for COVID-19 pneumonia.

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Alexithymia is associated with cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson’s disease

SENGUL Yildizhan, KOCAK Müge, CORAKCI Zeynep, SENGUL Serdar Hakan, USTUN Ismet

Cognitive dysfunction (CD) is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Alexithy­mia is a still poorly understood neuropsychiatric feature of PD. Cognitive impairment (especially visuospatial dysfunction and executive dysfunction) and alexithymia share com­mon pathology of neuroanatomical structures. We hypo­thesized that there must be a correlation between CD and alexithymia levels considering this relationship of neuroanatomy. Objective – The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between alexithymia and neurocognitive function in patients with PD. Thirty-five patients with PD were included in this study. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale–20 (TAS-20), Geriatric Depression Inventory (GDI) and a detailed neuropsychological evaluation were performed. Higher TAS-20 scores were negatively correlated with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) similarities test score (r =-0.71, p value 0.02), clock drawing test (CDT) scores (r=-0.72, p=0.02) and verbal fluency (VF) (r=-0.77, p<0.01). Difficulty identifying feelings subscale score was negatively correlated with CDT scores (r=-0.74, p=0.02), VF scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04), visual memory immediate recall (r=-0.74, p=0.01). VF scores were also correlated with difficulty describing feelings (DDF) scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04). There was a reverse relationship bet­ween WAIS similarities and DDF scores (r=-0.70, p=0.02), and externally oriented-thinking (r=-0.77,p<0.01). Executive function Z score was correlated with the mean TAS-20 score (r=-62, p=0.03) and DDF subscale score (r=-0.70, p=0.01) Alexithymia was found to be associated with poorer performance on visuospatial and executive function test results. We also found that alexithymia was significantly correlated with depressive symptoms. Presence of alexithymia should therefore warn the clinicians for co-existing CD.

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Electrophysiological investigation for autonomic dysfunction in patients with myasthenia gravis: A prospective study

NALBANTOGLU Mecbure, AKALIN Ali Mehmet, GUNDUZ Aysegul, KIZILTAN Meral

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Autonomic dysfunction is not a commonly known association with MG. We conducted this study to evaluate autonomic functions in MG & subgroups and to investigate the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. This study comprised 30 autoimmune MG patients and 30 healthy volunteers. Autonomic tests including sympathetic skin response (SSR) and R-R interval variation analysis (RRIV) was carried out. The tests were performed two times for patients who were under acetylcholinesterase inhibitors during the current assessment. The RRIV rise during hyperventilation was better (p=0.006) and Valsalva ratio (p=0.039) was lower in control group. The SSR amplitudes were lower thereafter drug intake (p=0.030). As much as time went by after drug administration prolonged SSR latencies were obtained (p=0.043).Valsalva ratio was lower in the AchR antibody negative group (p=0.033). The findings showed that both ocular/generalized MG patients have a subclinical parasympathetic abnormality prominent in the AchR antibody negative group and pyridostigmine has a peripheral sympathetic cholinergic noncumulative effect.

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[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

VASTAGH Ildikó, SZŐCS Ildikó, OBERFRANK Ferenc, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]