Clinical Neuroscience

[Hungarian Spine Association]

PENTELÉNYI Tamás

MAY 20, 1994

Clinical Neuroscience - 1994;47(05-06)

[The 1994 and 1995 scientific programme of the Hungarian Spine Association.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Transoral and anterolateral surgery of the cervical spine in ventral extradural pathological processes

EMIL Pásztor

This paper is a shortened version of an invited lecture given at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, on 17th September, 1993, illustrated with 120 slides.

Clinical Neuroscience

Correlation of clinical and molecular genetic findings in malignant brain stem tumors

V. K. Ammon, U. Sure, DN Louis, V. Deimling A.

Brain stem gliomas are rare, predominantly pediatric tumours. Histologically, they are comparable to adult supratentorial astrocytomas. Most of the pediatric brain stem tumours were classified as low-grade astrocytoma (WHO II), anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO III) or glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO IV). Survival of patients with malignant brain stem gliomas as WHO grade III and IV rarely exceeds more than two years. Recently developed molecular genetic techniques gave new insights in tumour biology. Oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes are genetic alterations which can cause tumorous transformation and furthermore malignant progression. Molecular genetic studies of malignant brain stem gliomas have rarely been investigated. Therefore, we set out to study 12 such tumours clinically and 2 by molecular biological methods.

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous occurence of unilateral multiplex meningiomas and syringomyelia

BÜKI András, MÉSZÁROS István, KÖVÉR Ferenc, KASÓ Gábor

Long lasting intracranial hypertension is considered to be a major pathogenic factor of syringomyelia in patients with a Chiari malformation or posterior fossa tumor.

Clinical Neuroscience

Different autoregulatory responses in the cerebellar cortex, neocortex and subcortical gray matter of the rat to systemic hypo- and hypertension

BALÁZS István, BARZÓ Pál, DÓCZI Tamás, PÓRSZÁSZ Róbert, SZOLCSÁNYI János

Cerebral autoregulation was investigated in the cerebral and cerebellar cortex, and subcortical gray matter (caudate nucleus) of the rat by means of Laser-Doppler flowmetry. As the vascular architecture of the basal ganglia, the cerebral cortex and the cerebellar cortex have substantial geometrical, onto genetical and pathological differences (3), we tested the working hypothesis that autoregulation of the blood supply to these areas may also be different. Laser-Doppler flowmetry has an ideal time resolution, and it enables analysis of flow-pressure curves (1, 2). The dependency of autoregulation on the rate of change in systemic blood pressure (SABP) in all three regions were confirmed. Control of CBF was significantly different in the subcortical gray matter and the neocortex. Interestingly, no autoregulatory capacity of the cerebellar vasculature was found.

Clinical Neuroscience

Epidermoid tumours of the posterior fossa

K. Bálint, F. Slowik, M. Kordás, J. Juhász, J. Julow

In opposite of the benign biological behaviour of the posterior fossa epidermoids the operation of these tumours a great challenge for the surgeon both theoretical and surgical point of view. We analysed our 14 operated cases clinico pathologically in this retrospective study.

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Alexithymia is associated with cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson’s disease

SENGUL Yildizhan, KOCAK Müge, CORAKCI Zeynep, SENGUL Serdar Hakan, USTUN Ismet

Cognitive dysfunction (CD) is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Alexithy­mia is a still poorly understood neuropsychiatric feature of PD. Cognitive impairment (especially visuospatial dysfunction and executive dysfunction) and alexithymia share com­mon pathology of neuroanatomical structures. We hypo­thesized that there must be a correlation between CD and alexithymia levels considering this relationship of neuroanatomy. Objective – The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between alexithymia and neurocognitive function in patients with PD. Thirty-five patients with PD were included in this study. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale–20 (TAS-20), Geriatric Depression Inventory (GDI) and a detailed neuropsychological evaluation were performed. Higher TAS-20 scores were negatively correlated with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) similarities test score (r =-0.71, p value 0.02), clock drawing test (CDT) scores (r=-0.72, p=0.02) and verbal fluency (VF) (r=-0.77, p<0.01). Difficulty identifying feelings subscale score was negatively correlated with CDT scores (r=-0.74, p=0.02), VF scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04), visual memory immediate recall (r=-0.74, p=0.01). VF scores were also correlated with difficulty describing feelings (DDF) scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04). There was a reverse relationship bet­ween WAIS similarities and DDF scores (r=-0.70, p=0.02), and externally oriented-thinking (r=-0.77,p<0.01). Executive function Z score was correlated with the mean TAS-20 score (r=-62, p=0.03) and DDF subscale score (r=-0.70, p=0.01) Alexithymia was found to be associated with poorer performance on visuospatial and executive function test results. We also found that alexithymia was significantly correlated with depressive symptoms. Presence of alexithymia should therefore warn the clinicians for co-existing CD.

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Electrophysiological investigation for autonomic dysfunction in patients with myasthenia gravis: A prospective study

NALBANTOGLU Mecbure, AKALIN Ali Mehmet, GUNDUZ Aysegul, KIZILTAN Meral

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Autonomic dysfunction is not a commonly known association with MG. We conducted this study to evaluate autonomic functions in MG & subgroups and to investigate the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. This study comprised 30 autoimmune MG patients and 30 healthy volunteers. Autonomic tests including sympathetic skin response (SSR) and R-R interval variation analysis (RRIV) was carried out. The tests were performed two times for patients who were under acetylcholinesterase inhibitors during the current assessment. The RRIV rise during hyperventilation was better (p=0.006) and Valsalva ratio (p=0.039) was lower in control group. The SSR amplitudes were lower thereafter drug intake (p=0.030). As much as time went by after drug administration prolonged SSR latencies were obtained (p=0.043).Valsalva ratio was lower in the AchR antibody negative group (p=0.033). The findings showed that both ocular/generalized MG patients have a subclinical parasympathetic abnormality prominent in the AchR antibody negative group and pyridostigmine has a peripheral sympathetic cholinergic noncumulative effect.

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[The Comprehensive Aphasia Test in Hungarian]

ZAKARIÁS Lilla, RÓZSA Sándor, LUKÁCS Ágnes

[In this paper we present the Comprehensive Aphasia Test-Hungarian (CAT-H; Zakariás and Lukács, in preparation), an assessment tool newly adapted to Hungarian, currently under standardisation. The test is suitable for the assessment of an acquired language disorder, post-stroke aphasia. The aims of this paper are to present 1) the main characteristics of the test, its areas of application, and the process of the Hungarian adaptation and standardisation, 2) the first results from a sample of Hungarian people with aphasia and healthy controls. Ninety-nine people with aphasia, mostly with unilateral, left hemisphere stroke, and 19 neurologically intact control participants were administered the CAT-H. In addition, we developed a questionnaire assessing demographic and clinical information. The CAT-H consists of two parts, a Cognitive Screening Test and a Language Test. People with aphasia performed significantly worse than the control group in all language and almost all cognitive subtests of the CAT-H. Consistent with our expectations, the control group performed close to ceiling in all subtests, whereas people with aphasia exhibited great individual variability both in the language and the cognitive subtests. In addition, we found that age, time post-onset, and type of stroke were associated with cognitive and linguistic abilities measured by the CAT-H. Our results and our experiences clearly show that the CAT-H provides a comprehensive profile of a person’s impaired and intact language abilities and can be used to monitor language recovery as well as to screen for basic cognitive deficits in aphasia. We hope that the CAT-H will be a unique resource for rehabilitation professionals and aphasia researchers in aphasia assessment and diagnostics in Hungary. ]

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[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

VASTAGH Ildikó, SZŐCS Ildikó, OBERFRANK Ferenc, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]