Clinical Neuroscience

[Hungarian neurologists, Gyula Donáth (1849-1944)]

HALÁSZ Péter

SEPTEMBER 30, 2012

Clinical Neuroscience - 2012;65(09-10)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Health status and costs of ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary]

PÉNTEK Márta, GULÁCSI László, RÓZSA Csilla, SIMÓ Magdolna, ILJICSOV Anna, KOMOLY Sámuel, BRODSZKY Valentin

[Background and purpose - Data on disease burden of multiple sclerosis from Eastern-Central Europe are very limited. Our aim was to explore the quality of life, resource utilisation and costs of ambulating patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two outpatient neurology centres in 2009. Clinical history, health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed, the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the EQ-5D questionnaires were applied. Cost calculation was conducted from the societal perspective. Results - Sixty-eight patients (female 70.6%) aged 38.0 (SD 9.1) with disease duration of 7.8 (SD 6.7) years were involved. Fifty-five (80.9%) had relapsing-remitting form and 52 (76.5%) were taking immunomodulatory drug. The average scores were: Expanded Disability Status Scale 1.9 (SD 1.7), EQ-5D 0.67 (SD 0.28). Mean total cost amounted to 10 902 Euros/patient/year (direct medical 67%, direct nonmedical 13%, indirect costs 20%). Drugs, disability pension and informal care were the highest cost items. Costs of mild (Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-3.5) and moderate (Expanded Disability Status Scale 4.0-6.5) disease were 9 218 and 17 634 Euros/patient/year respectively (p<0.01), that is lower than results from Western European countries. Conclusion - Our study provides current inputs for policy making and contributes to understanding variation of costof- illness of multiple sclerosis in Europe.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Burning sensation in oral cavity - burning mouth syndrome in everyday medical practice]

GERLINGER Imre

[Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) refers to chronic orofacial pain, unaccompanied by mucosal lesions or other evident clinical signs. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women. BMS is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, preferably on the tongue or in other areas of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by other sensory disorders such as dry mouth or taste alterations. Probably of multifactorial origin, and often idiopathic, with a still unknown etiopathogenesis in which local, systemic and psychological factors are implicated. Currently there is no consensus on the diagnosis and classification of BMS. This study reviews the literature on this syndrome, with special reference to the etiological factors that may be involved and the clinical aspects they present. The diagnostic criteria that should be followed and the therapeutic management are discussed with reference to the most recent studies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Administration of preemptive analgesia by diclofenac to prevent acute postcraniotomy headache]

SIMON Éva, BÁNK Judit, GÁL Judit, SIRÓ Péter, NOVÁK László, FÜLESDI Béla, MOLNÁR Csilla

[Purpose - Postcraniotomy headache (PCH) is a frequent perioperative complication in neuroanesthesia. The aim of the present work was to assess the incidence of PCH and to test the efficacy and safety of preoperatively administered diclofenac. Methods - Patients undergoing craniotomies for intracranial tumor resections were enrolled. In the case group 100 mg diclofenac p.o. one hour prior to surgery was used as a preemptive analgesic along with infiltration of the surgical site with a combination of lidocaine and epinephrine. In controls only surgical site infiltration was used. VAS scores were assessed preoperatively, on the day of surgery (DoS), on the 1st and 5th postoperative days. Results - We have found that PCH of any severity is between 50-90% during the first five days after surgery. The number of cases characterized as “no pain” significantly decreased in the early postoperative period, but remained in both groups still higher on the 5th postoperative day than observed preoperatively. In both groups, the number of headaches characterized as mild pain remained relatively stable and substantial increases in case numbers were observed in moderate and severe headaches, showing a declining tendency over time in the postoperative period. A significant effect of diclofenac pretreatment was observed compared to controls on DoS (χ2: 10.429, p<0.015), on the 1st (χ2: 8.75, p<0.032) and 5th postoperative days (χ2: 14.3, p<0.002). Conclusions - The relatively low incidence of severe PCH on day five in the diclofenac group may indicate that preoperatively administered diclofenac effectively reduces postcraniotomy headache. A randomized study is encouraged to test this hypothesis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[A prospective study evaluating the clinical characteristics of cluster headache]

ERTSEY Csaba, VESZA Zsófia, BANGÓ Márta, VARGA Tímea, NAGYIDEI Diána, MANHALTER Nóra, BOZSIK György

[Introduction - Although cluster headache (CH) is one of the most severe human pain syndromes, its symptoms and therapeutic possibilities may be suboptimally recognised in current medical practice in Hungary. Aim - To present the clinical characteristics of CH based on a prospective study of patients attending the Headache Service of the Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University. Methods - We collected information about the symptoms, diagnosis and previous treatment of CH patients by filling in a 108-item questionnaire during outpatient visits. Results - In the 5-year period between 2004 and 2008 we obtained data from 78 CH patients (57 males and 21 females; mean age: 44.6±14.6 years). The male:female ratio did not change in subgroups based on disease onset (calendar years). Ninety-three percent considered CH the most severe pain state of their life. The pain was strictly unilateral, affecting the territory of the 1st trigeminal division in all patients. The attacks were accompanied by signs of ipsilateral cranial parasympathetic activation (lactimation 83%, conjunctival injection 67%, rhinorrhea 56%, nasal congestion 43%); less frequently, signs of sympathetic dysfunction (ptosis 48%, miosis 7%) were also present. Two patients had attacks showing the typical localisation, severity and time course of CH attacks, but not accompanied by autonomic phenomena. A considerable part of the patients also observed symptoms that are usually ascribed to migraine (nausea 41%, vomiting 18%, photophobia 68%, phonophobia 58%). This may have been instrumental in the fact that, regardless of the characteristic clinical symptoms, the diagnosis of CH took 10 years on average. At the time of their examination 63% of patients were not using adequate abortive medications and 59% did not have an adequate prophylactic measure. Discussion - Cluster headache is characterised by attacks of devastating pain that warrant an early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Our study underlines that information about the diagnosis and therapy of CH should be emphasized on occasions of neurology specialty training and continuing medical education.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

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