Clinical Neuroscience

[Hemodynamic adaptation of fetal brain]

JAKOBOVITS Ákos1, HENDRIK Jörn2

SEPTEMBER 20, 1996

Clinical Neuroscience - 1996;49(09-10)

[Doppler color ultrasonography of the middle cerebral and umbilical arteries was performed on 104 fetuses born at term. A total of 254 investigations were carried out. Of the 104 fetuses studied, 52 infants had birth weights appropriate for gestational age (mean 3409.2 g) and 52 infants were small for gestational age (mean 2272.1 g). Cerebral hemodynamic adaptation was observed in growth retarded fetuses due to placenta! insufficiency. ln these cases the elevated umbilical vascular resistance evidenced the placenta! insufficiency. At the same time the decrease of the cerebral vascular velocimetry indexes indicated the improving cerebral blood supply. Only the systolic/diastolic ratio was significantly reduced in growth retarded fetuses when compared with normal controls. ln the umbilical artery the pulsatility index and systolic/diastolic ratio were raised significantly in growth retarded fetuses. The ratio of the cerebral arterial to umbilical cord artery index values proved a better indicator of the difference between growth retarded and normal controls than the index of the cerebral or umbilical artery alone. The ratios of all three index values of the growth retarded fetuses were significantly smaller than those of the normal controls (pulsatility index 1.03 versus 1. 60, resistance index 0.84 versus 1.19 and systolic/diastolic ratio 1.01 versus 2.02). The ratios of the small for date fetuses due to other, nonplacental causes were simi­ lar to the normal controls. The blood circulation disorder evokes hemodynamic adaptation in the feta! brain. The intrauterine growth restriction is a consequence of this disturbed blood supply. The cerebral circulatory adaptation failed in the small for date fetuses non associated with decreased blood supply.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Toldi Ferenc Kórház, Szülészeti és Nőgyógyászati Osztály, Cegléd
  2. RWTH, Orvostudományi Kar, Szülészeti és Nőgyógyászati Klinika, Aachen

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