Clinical Neuroscience

[Forum of Young Neurologists Szeged. October 1992]

SEPTEMBER 20, 1993

Clinical Neuroscience - 1993;46(09-10)

[Motor neuron diseases. Analysis of our cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Experimental immune-mediated substantia nigra damage. Role of ansa galeni in the laryngeal protective reflex - intraoperative neuromyographic studies in dogs. Prognostic role of conduction velocity measurements in Bell's palsy. Nervous system inflammation. A subtype case of meningoencephalitis. Ophthalmoplegia in herpes zooster (two cases presented). Differential diagnostic problems in cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome. A case of central nervous system complication associated with SLE (clinicopathological presentation). Ventriculo-peritoneal (vp) shunt in basal arachnitis with severe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulatory disturbance. Pain syndrome. Spect and TCD studies in cluster headache. Incidence of migraine in our department. Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with glycerol infiltration of the Meckel's pouch. Pain syndromes caused by osteoporosis. Other neurological problems. Neuropsychiatric aspects of hypoparathyroidism. Practice in the preoperative evaluation of patients with therapy-resistant bitemporal epilepsy (case presentation). A case report of a tumor of the corpus callosum. Co-occurrence of meningioma and basilar giant aneurysm (case report). The value of cervical duplex ultrasound in the care of cerebrovascular patients (experience of 700 studies). Experience in ultrasound examination of the carotid artery in patients with lower extremity vascular stenosis. Laser Doppler circulatory testing for monitoring cochlear autoregulation. New possibilities in ABR studies using the dantec counterpoint MK-2 EMG/EP. Use of HBS-Madopar in Parkinson's syndrome with special reference to nocturnal dystonia. Role of HBS-Madopar in different types of on-off.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Pharmaco-EEG investigation on sedative effect of antiallergic drugs. Setastin is a non-sedative antihistamina]

RAJNA Péter, VERES Judit

[Effect of setastine on pharmaco-EEG was investigated in a double blind placebo controlled study in ten healthy volunteers. Changes caused by setastine were compared with those of two referent antihistamine drugs (chloropyramine and hismanal) having great differences in their sedative side effect. The themporo-occipital alpha per theta ratio was the most sensitive EEG marker in differentiating the two referent drugs. The EEG effect showed by setastine was very similar to that to hismanal and opposite to that of chloropyramine. In addition an increase of the total power and the power of beta was also measured. The latter changes might refer to an inherent EEG effect of setastine. EEG changes of setastine cannot be evaluated as signs of hypovigilance and the similarity of EEG effect of hismanal and setastine also supports the non-sedative nature of setastine estabilished by clinical studies. The pharmaco-EEG method utilized gives possibility for an objective investigation of psychotropic side effects of the particular drugs. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Efficacy of cinolazepam on insomnia generated under shift-work conditions]

KÖVES Péter

[The efficacy of cinolazepam (a benzodiazepine with middle half life time and light pharmacological potential) on insomnia generated under shift-work conditions was investigated, and shown to be an efficent hypnotic. Cinolazepam (daytime dose 20 mg, night dose 40 mg) improved significantly both sleep and awakening quality: there were no hangover effects, drug provoked intrasleep or early morning insomnia. During the time cinolazepam was administered drug tolerance was not observed. The structure of cinolazepam-induced sleep could be characterised by shortened sleep latency, increase of deep slow wave sleep, improvment of sleep continuity and unchange of REM sleep parameters both during night- and daytime.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Observation of embolic events during carotis constructive surgery]

RÓZSA András, ENZT László, JÁRÁNYI Zsuzsa

[The changes of middle cerebral artery circulation during carotid artery surgery in 65 patients were monitored, and the observed embolic events are discussed. Of the 65 patients, 37 were operated with shunt protection (group A) and 28 without (group B). In 31 of all cases 55 embolic events were noted. In 22 of the group A patients 37 embolic events were observed, one of them occured during the declamping of the external caruiid circulation. Eighteen emboli were observed in 9 of the Group B cases. There were embolic events in 5 cases due to external declamping. All the above mentioned embolic events occured without postoperative clinical sings.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Experiences with carotid-doppler examinations on patients with arterial bypass operation on the lower extremities]

OLÁH László, FÜLESDI Béla, VALIKOVICS Atilla, CSIBA László, OLVASZTÓ Sándor, BÁNFI Csaba, KOZLOVSZKI Bertalan

[Carotis-Doppler examinations were performed on 83 patients with severe, obliterative disease of the arteries of the lower extremities and on 96 age-matched controls without signs and symptoms. In the group with obliterative arterial disease, severe or moderate stenosis of the carotid arteries was found in 20 and 40% of the patients, respectively, whereas in the control group the proportion of moderate carotid-stenosis was 2% and no case of severe stenosis was found. The role of risk factors was also studied. Based on their results the authors suggest, that because patients with obliterative disease on the arteries of the lower extremities have higher risk for stenosis, ultrasound investigations and regular follow up of the carotid arteries are needed.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Brachioradial syndrome: superficial radial neuropathy]

KISS Gábor

[Damage of the superficial branch of the radial nerve represents a rare, and rarely recognized, mononeuropathy. The first three cases in the Hungarian literature are presented. The essential role of electrodiagnosis in detecting of the disease is stressed. Special attention should be paid to avoid any lesion which might result from improper patient-care.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[The role of sleep in the relational memory processes ]

CSÁBI Eszter, ZÁMBÓ Ágnes, PROKECZ Lídia

[A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep plays an essential role in the consolidation of different memory systems, but less is known about the beneficial effect of sleep on relational memory processes and the recognition of emotional facial expressions, however, it is a fundamental cognitive skill in human everyday life. Thus, the study aims to investigate the effect of timing of learning and the role of sleep in relational memory processes. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. Our results suggest that the timing of learning and sleep plays an important role in the stabilizing process of memory representation to resist against forgetting.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

VASTAGH Ildikó, SZŐCS Ildikó, OBERFRANK Ferenc, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[A short chronicle of three decades ]

KAPRONCZAY Katalin

[Hungarian professional periodicals started quite late in European context. Their publish­ing, editing and editorial philosophy were equally influenced by specific historical and political situations. Certain breaking points of history resulted in termina­tion of professional journals (War of In­de­pendence 1848-1849, First and Se­cond World Wars), however there were pe­riods, which instigated the progress of sciences and founding of new scientific journals. Both trends were apparent in years after the fall of former Hungarian regime in 1990. The structure of book and journal publishing has changed substantially, some publishers fell “victim” others started successfully as well. The latters include the then-established publishing house Literatura Medica and its own scientific journal, Lege Artis Me­di­cinae (according to its subtitle: New Hun­garian Medical Herald) issued first in 1990. Its appearance enhanced significantly the medical press market. Its scientific publications compete with articles of the well-established domestic medical journals however its philosophy set brand-new trends on the market. Concerning the medical community, it takes on its problems and provides a forum for them. These problems are emerging questions in health care, economy and prevention, in close interrelation with system of public health institutions, infrastructure and situation of those providing individual health services. In all of them, Lege Artis Medicinae follows consequently the ideas of traditional social medicine.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Covid-19 associated neurological disorders]

SZÔTS Mónika, PÉTERFI Anna, GERÖLY Júlia, NAGY Ferenc

[The clinical signs of SARS-CoV-2 infection has become more recognisable in recent times. In addition to common symptoms such as fever, cough, dyspnea, pneumonia and ageusia, less common complications can be identified, including many neurological manifestations. In this paper, we discuss three Covid-19 associated neurological disorders (Case 1: Covid-19 encephalitis, Case 2: Covid-19 organic headache, Case 3: SARS-CoV-2-infection and ischaemic stroke). We emphasize in our multiple case study that during the present pandemic, it is especially important for neurologists to be aware of the nervous system complications of the virus infection, thus saving unnecessary examinations and reducing the frequency of patients’ contact with health care personnel. ]