Clinical Neuroscience

[Examining the diagnostic accuracy of a new migraine screener]

CSÉPÁNY Éva, BOZSIK György, KELLERMANN István, HAJNAL Boglárka, SCHEIDL Erika, PALÁSTI Ágnes, TÓTH Marianna, GYÜRE Tamás, ERTSEY Csaba

JULY 30, 2014

Clinical Neuroscience - 2014;67(07-08)

[Background - Migraine affects more than 10% of the Hungarian population, causes significant disability and severely affects patients’ generic and condition-specific quality of life. Despite these facts, a significant proportion of patients is not diagnosed and not treated adequately. Headache centres can provide care for only a fraction of all patients. The task of primary care providers would be greatly simplified by a reliable self-administered migraine screening questionnaire. Objective - To develop a short and reliable questionnaire as a migraine screening tool. Methods - Outpatients at the Headache Service, Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University completed a self-administered questionnaire which contained 9 yes/no questions about their headaches’ characteristics. The number of ’yes’ answers (the patients’ total score) was evaluated in connection with the diagnosis based on the International Headache Society criteria. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value as well as the misclassification rate for each total score value and used these to establish the final cutoff value of the questionnaire. 306 patients (242 females, mean age 39.1±13.3 years) were enrolled. The diagnosis was migraine in 244. Results - Completing the questionnaire did not pose any difficulty for the patients. At a cutoff value of 5 points the questionnaire’s sensitivity was 0.96 and specificity was 0.61. The positive predictive value was 0.91 and the negative predictive value was 0.81. The misclassification rate was 0.11. Discussion - Our results show that the questionnaire may help the diagnosis of migraine. In order to use it in medical practice, its further evaluation is necessary on a large representative sample of the Hungarian population.]

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KARÁCSONY Mária, BENCSIK Krisztina, VÉCSEI László

[Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic disease of the central nervous system in young adults. No curative therapy is known. Currently, six drugs are available that can reduce the activity of MS. The first-line drugs can completely reduce the activity of the disease in nearly two-thirds of the patients. In the remainder, who suffer from breakthrough disease, the condition of the patient worsens, and secondline therapies must be used. The second-line drug natalizumab exhibits almost double efficacy of the first-line drugs, but also have less favourable adverse effects. As a severe side-effect for instance, natalizumab carries the risk of the development of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML), caused by a polyoma virus, the JC virus. There are three major risk factors for PML: an anti-JCV antibody status, a long duration of natalizumab treatment and prior immunosuppressant therapy. The lowest-risk group (1:14 286) comprises of patients who are anti-JCV antibody-negative, in whom the prior immunosuppressant use and duration of natalizumab therapy do not influence the risk of PML. With no prior immunosuppressant treatment, the incidence of PML increases to 1 in 192 patients after 2 years among those who are anti-JCV antibody-positive. These data may lead the physician to decide to discontinue natalizumab treatment. The half-life of natalizumab is three months; during this time other therapies can not be administered and the patients encounter the rebound effect: as the patients receiving natalizumab therapy displayed a high disease activity before treatment, the rebound effect can lead to relapses. After the termination of natalizumab secondline disease-modifying therapy with fingolimod may be introduce; no PML cases occur in response to fingolimod treatment. In the large majority of patients taking natalizumab who do not develop PML, this drug is highly effective and can prevent the progression of MS. The benefit of therapy and the risk of PML must be considered on an individual basis, with regard to the disease activity, the progression and the MRI activity, before natalizumab therapy is implemented.]

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[Background and purpose of our study was to develop a precise dose delivery technique for partial brain irradiation of two rats simultaneously. Methods - Using a self-developed frame stereotactic radiotherapy with single doses of 30-90 Gy was delivered to the frontal lobe of 22 animals. Tolerability and reproducibility of the method were evaluated and dosimetric measurements were conducted to verify the treatment plans. 2, 4 and 6 months after the irradiation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and histopathological examinations were performed to detect late radiation induced biological changes. Results - Immobilization device provided excellent reproducibility and tolerability. Dosimetry revealed good corres - pondence with planned dose distribution, but the measured absorbed dose was 30% lower than the planned dose. During the 6 months follow-up period the procedure related death of subject animals after 30 Gy, 70 Gy and 90 Gy were 0%, 20% and 100% respectively. T2 signal and structural changes on MRI scans found to be dose and time dependent. While 30 Gy caused no detectable structural changes, 70 Gy lead to cystic necrosis in 2 cases after 4 month. Histopathology revealed signs of necrosis on macroscopic examination after 70 Gy in the high dose region involving both frontal lobes, and no obvious microscopic changes in the surrounding area were detectable. Conclusion - Our technique of rat cranial irradiation using human stereotactic system provided high accuracy of single dose delivery for a pair of small animals, resulting in brain injury in the defined area. This method proved to be a reproducible model for preclinical studies on radiation effects.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

The effect of psychiatric comorbidities and stress-coping strategies on perceived quality of life in migraine

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Purpose – Migraine is one of the most disabling primary headache conditions. We aimed to detect hidden symptoms of anxiety and depression and to survey stress-coping mechanisms and related quality of life in a large migraine population without any known psychiatric comorbidity. Method – 123 migraine patients (MG) and 66 healthy subjects (HC) completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (S-STAI and T-STAI), the Stress and Coping Inventory (SCI) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results – MG patients reached significantly higher scores on the BDI-II and the T-STAI yielding previously undetected anxiety and depression symptoms. Significant differences were present on the SCI: higher stress scores and lower coping levels suggested impaired stress-coping strategies in migraine. MG patients achieved significantly lower scores on most of SF-36 subscales indicating lower perceived quality of life. Significant correlations were found between BDI-II, T-STAI, SCI scores and subscales of the SF-36. Conclusion – Unrecognized symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as less effective stress-coping strategies might be related to the lower perceived quality of life in migraine. The screening of these symptoms might lead to more focused and efficient therapeutic strategies. Addressing stress management techniques could improve quality of life on the long-term.