Clinical Neuroscience

[Epidemiology of dementia in Hungary]

ÉRSEK Katalin1, KÁRPÁTI Krisztián1, KOVÁCS Tibor2, CSILLIK Gabriella3, GULÁCSI L. Ádám1, GULÁCSI László1

MAY 30, 2010

Clinical Neuroscience - 2010;63(05-06)

[Objective - To estimate the epidemiology and the distribution of disease severity of dementia in Hungary, using published data. To estimate the demented population of 2008 and to make a projection for 2050. Methodology - With an outlook for the international professional literature and the available Hungarian information we examine the epidemiology of dementia in Hungary by age-groups and disease severity (according to MMSE categories), then make our estimation for the entire population. Results - Based on the estimation of the number of demented people in Hungary there is a noticeable difference between the domestic and the internationally published data. According to previous Hungarian studies, the number of the demented subjects vary between 530 and 917 thousand patients. Multiplying the elderly age-group’s populations by the global prevalence data it results in 101 thousand of demented patients. Estimation by the domestic published data we remarkably overestimate the presumed value, whereas by using the global prevalence figures we underestimate. Conclusions - There is a strong need for a representative study to obtain exact figures on the prevalence of dementia in Hungary. Getting exact figures of the Hungarian prevalence of dementia it is a strong need an overall representative study. With the lack of it the health and social care systems are not able to prepare for providing the increasing number of patients.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Budapesti Corvinus Egyetem, Egészség-gazdaságtani és Egészségügyi Technológiaelemzési Kutatóközpont, HunHTA, Budapest
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Budapest
  3. Szociális és Munkaügyi Minisztérium, Budapest

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