Clinical Neuroscience

[Electrophysiological investigations in Parkinson’s diseae]

SZIRMAI Imre, GERTRÚD Tamás, TAKÁTS Annamária, PÁLVÖLGYI László, KAMONDI Anita

JUNE 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(05-06)

[Objective - Post-movement beta synchronization is an increase in EEG beta power after movement termination. Its characteristics in movement disorders are not well described. Tremor dominant Parkinson’s disease shows unique clinical, anatomical and biochemical features. In our study we examined the relation between the laterality of tremor and size of post-movement beta synchronisation in tremor dominant Parkinson’s disease. Methods - In a self-paced movement paradigm we measured movement duration and analyzed EEG power changes at movement-reactive beta frequencies. Results - Movement duration was significantly longer in Parkinson-patients than in controls (0.49±0.170 s, 0.35±0.087 s, p=0.013, Mann-Whitney test). There was no difference between the two hands in the control group (0.36±0.078s, 0.34±0.099 s, p=0.207, Wilcoxon-test), while Parkinson patients performed longer movement with their left hand (0.52±0.195 s, 0.46±0.148 s, p=0.049, Wilcoxon), unrelated to the side of tremor. In controls, post-movement beta synchronisation contralateral to the movement was not significantly different after right and left hand movement (108.1±68.21% and 92.1±23.43%, p=0.78 Wilcoxon). In Parkinson patients post-movement beta synchronisation was significantly smaller contralateral to the tremulous hand movement (36.9±47.79%, 104.7±91.42%, p=0.012, Wilcoxon-test). The post-movement beta synchronisation showed anterior shifting in Parkinson-patients. Conclusions - In tremor dominant Parkinson’s disease the asymmetric decrease of post-move beta synchronisation is related to the laterality of tremor rather than bradykinesia. Analysis of this phenomena might provide further insight to the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Identification of gliomas by morphological and immunocytochemical analysis in cell cultures]

FAZEKAS Ilona, KEREKES Edit, HEGEDŰS Balázs, NYÁRY István

[Introduction - The morphology and immunocytochemical properties of 250 different monolayer cultures derived from various human brain tumor specimens were investigated on purpose to support and complement the neuropatholgical diagnosis. In this study analyses of 124 glioma cases are presented. Methods - The tumor samples were mechanically dissociated and seeded on glass coverslips. After the formation of the monolayer cultures were fixed and stained by May-Grünwald- Giemsa method for the morphological examination. Semi-quantitative immunocytochemical labeling included several different types of mono- and polyclonal primary antibodies using avidin-biotin visualization system. In nine cases of the glioblastomas the sufficient proliferation made possible to establish cell lines from the primary cultures. Results - The glial origin of the tumors was identified in 124 cases based upon the presence of glial fibrillary acidic protein. A negative correlation between the intensity of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunostaining and the grade of tumor malignancy was found. During long-term cultivation of the higher grade gliomas the incidence and intensity of glial fibrillary acidic protein labeled cells was decreasing. Both the vimentin and the neuron specific enolase labeling were in general stronger than the glial fibrillary acidic protein and almost all the cells were stained. The incidence of Ki-67 positive cells increased with the grade of malignancy. Concerning the tumor classification our immunocytochemical results correlated with the routine histopathological examination. Conclusions - On the basis of these results we conclude that monolayer cultures obtained from tumor specimens can support and complement the correct diagnosis of the various human brain tumors.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Investigation of insertion/deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene on stroke patients]

PONGRÁCZ Endre, TORDAI Attila, CSORNAI Márta, NAGY Zoltán

[Introduction - This is the first Hungarian paper on the insertion/deletion polymorphism of ACE gene in stroke patients. According to literature data, the role of this polymorphism is controversial in the pathogenesis of stroke. The aim was to study the prevalence of the polymorphism in healthy persons and in stroke patients. Patients and methods - Blood samples from 173 unrelated healthy donors and 253 stroke patients were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Preivous stroke was documented by CT or MRI and CDS. A routine questionnaire was used to study previous vascular events and the risk profile of patients. Results - I/I allele was found in 20%, I/D 52% and D/D 28% in the healthy group. Prevalence of the pathologic D/D allele did not differ between healthy and patients group (28% and 27%, OR: 0.88, and in subgroup age under 50 years OR: 1.00). No correlation was found between D/D and conventional risk profile but a positiv correlation was found in young patients having D/D and hyperlipidemia (p<0.05) and hyperfibrinogenemia (p<0.05). D/D prevalence was found higher in patients with family anamnesis of myocardial infarction (p<0.05). Very low prevalence of D/D allele was found in cardiogen embolic group (p>0.05). Conclusions - The ACE polymorphism does not seem to be an independent risk factor for stroke. However, in young stroke patients with D/D allele, hyperlipidemia and/or hyperfibrinogenemia present very high risk for stroke.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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Vestibular evoked myogenic potential responses in Parkinson’s disease

CICEKLI Esen, TITIZ Pinar Ayse, TITIZ Ali, OZTEKIN Nese, MUJDECI Banu

Background - Our objectives were to determine the differences in the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) responses in patients diagnosed with early staged idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) compared to the normal population and evaluate the vestibular system disorder causing balance-posture disorders. Second aim of this study was to investigate caloric test responses particularly in early staged PD compared to normal popu­lation. Material and methods - Thirty patients (14 females and 16 males; mean age, 60.6 ± 13.1 years) diagnosed with idiopathic PD and 28 healthy subjects (20 males and 8 females; mean age, 59.1 ± 6.4 years) were included. The patient and control groups were subdivided according to their age, gender and the patient group was subdivided according to onset time of the Parkinson symptoms, Hoehn-Yahr staging. The subgroups were compared for VEMP and caloric test responses. Results - There were no significant differences between the study and control groups for right and left VEMP measurements. Patients over 60 years and under 60 years did not show significant differences in terms of right and left mean VEMP measurements. However, P1 amplitude was significantly lower in patients over 60 years old (P = .004). Gender, disease duration, BERG balance scale and Hoehn-Yahr stage had no effect on the VEMP amplitudes. There was no significant correlation with the side of Parkinsonian symptoms to the side of canal paresis (P = .566) and the side on which no VEMP response was obtained in caloric test. Conclusion - VEMP responses were not different between PD and healthy subjects. VEMP P1 amplitude was decreased with age in PD group. Canal paresis and symptoms side were not statistically correlated in caloric test.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Selection of the optimal device-aided therapy in Parkinson’s disease]

KOVÁCS Norbert, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, JUHÁSZ Annamária, HARMAT Márk, PINTÉR Dávid, JANSZKY József

[For the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease the deep brain stimulation (DBS) and the levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) therapies are available in Hungary. Although they may have similar impact on the health-related quality of life and disabilities associated with the disease, they have different indications, and inclusion- and exclusion criteria. Consequently, the patient population treated with DBS and LCIG may be different. In the present review, the authors try to help the process of selection of the optimal device-aided therapy for the patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Caregiver burden and quality of life in early stages of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease

YUKSEL Burcu, AK Dogan Pelin, SEN Aysu, SARIAHMETOGLU Hande, USLU Celiker Sibel, ATAKLI Dilek

Objectives - The aim of this study was to assess the impact of early stage of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD) on caregiver burden with disease severity, duration, disability and psychiatric symptoms. Methods - 30 IPD patient (15 female, 15 male) - caregiver (18 female, 12 male) pairs participated in the study. Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) scale was used to provide the assessment of disease progression and Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was used for assessing disability and impairment. Zarit Caregiver Burden Inventory (ZCBI) was used to ascertain the distress experienced by caregivers. Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) was performed on both patient and caregiver groups to evaluate anxiety and depression. Depressive symptoms of both groups were also measured by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Patients’ psychotic symptoms were assessed using the part 1- mentation, behavior and mood section of UPDRS. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to evaluate dementia symptoms and Short Form-36 (SF-36) was also used to assess quality of life. Results - We found significant correlation between caregiver burden with disease severity and duration. There was a significant difference between high UPDRS scores and the caregiver’s will for placing her/his patient in a long-term institution. Patients who had depression risk according to BDI had also high UPDRS scores. Patients with off period had higher UPDRS scores and lower SF-36 subdomains of general health, physical functioning, emotional role and social functioning. Conclusion - IPD is a chronic, progressive neuro- degenerative disease and comprises substantial burden on patients, families of patients and caregivers. The disease duration and disability have a remarkable impact on caregiver burden. For the good quality of caregiving, protective therapies should be recommended for caregivers if needed.

Lege Artis Medicinae

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